ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Relief for IBS, Colitis, Crohn’s And More

B Vitamins May Protect Against Damaging Effects of Air Pollution, and Improve Cognition and Psychiat...

Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) - are you running a marathon each night?

Can Magnesium Relieve Your Tinnitus?

Resveratrol Proven to Slow Brain Aging

Cassia Bark Oil: Why It's Valuable in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Fruits and vegetables' latest superpower? Lowering blood pressure

Neroli Oil: The Pleasantly Fragrant Citrus Oil

Prenatal vitamin D could help prevent autism in children

Magnesium Protects Against Stroke, Heart Disease and Diabetes

 
Print Page
Email Article

Australian Researchers Explain How Stress Can Make You Sick

  [ 195 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • December 7, 2005


Source: Research Australia Garvan Institute scientists have discovered how a hormone, known as neuropeptide Y (NPY), can prevent our immune system functioning properly, paving the way for two new major opportunities for therapeutic intervention. "Most of us expect to come down with a cold or other illness when we are under pressure, but until now we have mostly had circumstantial evidence for a link between the brain and the immune system", says lead Garvan researcher Associate Professor Fabienne Mackay. "During periods of stress, nerves release a lot of NPY and it gets into the bloodstream, where it directly impacts on the cells in the immune system that look out for and destroy pathogens (bacteria and viruses) in the body," explains Mackay. This significant discovery, which was carried out in mice, came about through a collaboration between Mackay's immunology group and scientists in the Neurobiology programme at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. Associate Professor Herbert Herzog who heads the Neurobiology programme says, "Elite athletes are particularly prone to illness, possibly because of the extreme physical and emotional stressors associated with competition. But our research is relevant to everyone because there is no escaping stress – be it in the workplace or at home. Employment surveys show many workers feel there is more job-related stress today than even a couple of years ago". Absenteeism, around 30% of which can be attributed to own ill health or physical disability , costs well over $10 billion Australian dollars a year , so now more than ever employers should be thinking about how to reduce stress in the hope that their workforce will be healthier. The Garvan Institute study centres on two key events that enable our bodies to recognise foreign substances and control invaders. When we encounter a pathogen (bacteria and viruses), the immune 'sentry' cells that are on guard duty retain and interrogate the suspects. Their activation is made possible by NPY. These cells then return to the lymph nodes, which are found all over the body, with information about the foreign invaders. The lymph nodes are where decisions about defense are made. In the case of bacteria and viruses, TH1 cells are part of the attack team that is sent out on the 'search and destroy' mission. But when their job is done they need to be turned 'off' and the immune system reset. The same hormone, NPY, that activates the sentry cells now prompts the TH1 cells to slow down and die. Mackay adds that: "Under normal conditions, circulating immune cells produce small amounts of NPY, which enables the immune cells on sentry duty and the TH1 immune cells to operate – it's a yin and yang kind of situation. But too much NPY means that the TH1 attack is prevented despite the foreign invaders being identified – and this is what happens during stress." Understanding the connection between NPY and the immune system offers two new major opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The first is to design new drugs to stimulate immune system defences in people exposed to high levels of stress, such as in a bereavement situation, and in immuno-compromised individuals. The second is to exploit this Th1 inhibitory mechanism to prevent immune responses getting out of control as in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, type I diabetes and lupus. About Garvan The Garvan Institute of Medical Research was founded in 1963 by the Sisters of Charity. Initially a small research department of St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, it is now one of Australia's largest medical research institutions with over three hundred scientists, students and support staff. The Garvan Institute has six main research programs: Arthritis & Inflammation, Bone & Mineral, Cancer, Diabetes & Obesity, Neurobiology and Pituitary. Associate Professor Fabienne Mackay is a Principal Research Fellow in the Arthritis and Inflammation Research Program at the Garvan Institute and a Conjoint Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW and University of Sydney. She is also a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow. Associate Professor Herbert Herzog is a Principal Research Fellow and the Director of the Neurobiology Program at the Garvan Institute. He is also a National Health and Medical Senior Research Fellow; an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales; and an Associate Professor for Biochemistry, Department of Biochemistry, Free University of Berlin. This research is being published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, Volume 202, No. 11, December 5, 2005, pp1-13.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® FibroSleep™

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid

Natural Remedies

Natural Relief for Soreness, Pain and Swelling - Putting Out the Fire Natural Relief for Soreness, Pain and Swelling - Putting Out the Fire
Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS
Pioneer Scientists Uncover a Revolutionary Neuroprotective Supplement for Nerve Health Pioneer Scientists Uncover a Revolutionary Neuroprotective Supplement for Nerve Health
Strengthen Cell Function with Energy-Boosting Niagen Strengthen Cell Function with Energy-Boosting Niagen
Thyroid Health and Fibromyalgia Thyroid Health and Fibromyalgia

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map