ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Fighting Heartburn and Gerd Naturally – And Safely!

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

Curcumin Reverses the Cellular Damage of Chronic Stress

Probiotics improve cognition in Alzheimer's patients

The Onion: Cancer Fighter and Food Preserver

 
Print Page
Email Article

Inflammation Considered Major Heart Attack Trigger

  [ 162 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • August 19, 2002


By Daniel Q. Haney, AP medical editor

BOSTON -- Worse than cholesterol? Hard to believe, perhaps, but the top health concern of millions of Americans is about to be trumped by what doctors say is an even bigger trigger of heart attacks.

The condition is low-grade inflammation, which may originate in a variety of unlikely places throughout the body, including even excess fat. New federal recommendations are being written that will urge doctors to test millions of middle-aged Americans for it.

The discovery of its surprising ill effects is causing a top-to-bottom rethinking of the origins and prevention of heart trouble. Doctors call it a revolutionary departure from viewing the world's top killer as largely a plumbing problem blamed on cholesterol-clogged arteries, the standard theory through the modern era of cardiology.

"The implications of this are enormous," said Dr. Paul Ridker of Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital. "It means we have an entire other way of treating, targeting and preventing heart disease that was essentially missed because of our focus solely on cholesterol."

In the past year or two, experts say, the evidence has become overwhelming that inflammation hidden deep in the body is a common trigger of heart attacks, even when clogging in the arteries is minimal. Now the main question is: How aggressively should otherwise healthy people be tested to find and treat it?

The new recommendations are still being drawn up, but they will offer the first formal blueprint to answer this, probably sometime in the fall. Doctors writing them say they will almost certainly recommend broad testing.

Inflammation can be measured with a generic $10 test that looks for high levels of a chemical called C-reactive protein, one of many that increase during inflammation. Experts expect it to quickly become a standard part of physical exams. As a result, many people ordinarily considered at low risk will probably be put on statin drugs, which lower inflammation as well as cholesterol.

No one disputes the importance of cholesterol. Yet half of all heart attack victims have levels that are normal or even low. Clearly, something big was missing from the equation, and that appears to be inflammation.
Ridker estimates that between 25 million and 35 million healthy middle-aged Americans have normal cholesterol but above-average inflammation, putting them at unusual risk of heart attacks and strokes.

A series of landmark studies by his team, beginning in 1997, suggest inflammation is more important than cholesterol at triggering heart attacks.
They found those with high levels of C-reactive protein have twice the risk of people with elevated cholesterol.

High amounts of the protein also predict increased risk of heart attacks and strokes years before they occur, even when cholesterol levels are low. Having both inflammation and high cholesterol together is especially ominous, resulting in a nine-fold increase in risk.

Everyone who reaches middle age has some degree of fatty buildup, called plaque, in the heart arteries. The new evidence suggests it becomes threatening if weakened by inflammation, which makes it squishy and fragile. Even a small lump of plaque can burst like an overripe pimple, prompting the formation of a clot that in turn chokes off blood flow and causes a heart attack.

Many people with no outward signs of anything wrong have high levels of internal inflammation. It is exactly the same sort that causes swelling, heat and redness during infections or allergic rashes.
Doctors believe the internal inflammation has many possible sources. Often, the plaque itself becomes inflamed as white blood cells invade in a misguided defense attempt.

But inflammation that arises elsewhere apparently can be as bad, for it bombards the plaque with damaging chemicals.

For instance, fat cells churn out these inflammatory proteins, which helps explain why being overweight is so bad for the heart. Other possible triggers include high blood pressure, smoking and lingering low-level infections, such as chronic gum disease.

Although many chemicals increase during inflammation, C-reactive protein, or CRP, is particularly easy to measure. Some already test for it, including White House doctors, who checked President Bush's CRP level last summer. (His was extremely low.)

In March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Heart Association held a meeting of 50 experts in Atlanta to review the scientific evidence on inflammation and make recommendations.

These are still being discussed, but some doctors involved say they are likely to urge CRP screening for people already considered at mild to moderate risk of heart attacks. These include smokers and those with a combination of other less ominous risks, such as being middle-aged and having borderline high cholesterol or blood pressure. For instance, they might recommend CRP testing for a 45-year-old man with cholesterol in the low 200s and blood pressure just below the cutoff for treatment.

However, others believe CRP should be measured in everyone over age 40, just like cholesterol, regardless of their other risk factors.

"It begins to look like a standard risk factor that one would evaluate at least once in middle age in most people," said Dr. Wayne Alexander of Emory University, one member of the recommendations committee.

Doctors hope to have the recommendations ready for publication in the journal Circulation in November, followed by a campaign to teach doctors and ordinary people about it. "Our goal is to have a broad-based consensus and use all available means to disseminate that information widely," said Dr. George Mensah, the CDC's chief of cardiovascular health.

Many hospitals can already do the test. However, until the recommendations come out, most doctors are unlikely to know exactly whom to test or what to make of the results.

CRP probably will not matter much for heart attack survivors and others who already know they have heart disease, since presumably doctors are already doing everything they can to keep their condition from getting worse.
"We believe the niche for C-reactive protein -- and it is a large niche -- is the healthy population who want to do what they can to lower their risk of cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Richard Cannon of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Screening is important because inflammation can be readily lowered in several ways. One of the most powerful is losing weight. Exercise also helps, as does moderate alcohol intake, giving up smoking and lowering blood pressure.
Many of the standard heart medicines also lower inflammation. These include aspirin, Plavix, ACE inhibitors and the statin drugs, such as Lipitor and Zocor.

On the Net:
Heart Association: www.americanheart.org/ presenter.jhtml?identifier4648




Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health

Natural Remedies

SAD? Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder SAD? Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder
Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function
Herbal Inflammation Management for Whole Body Health Herbal Inflammation Management for Whole Body Health
Carry a Massage Therapist in Your Pocket Carry a Massage Therapist in Your Pocket
Front Line Defense Against Colds & Flu - Support for Healthy Immune System Balance Front Line Defense Against Colds & Flu - Support for Healthy Immune System Balance

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map