ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

10 Fibro-Friendly Foods with a Bonus: Beautiful Skin

Studies Show that Magnesium L-threonate Improves Brain Plasticity, Leading to Direct and Significant...

Clary Sage Oil May Be Pricey, but Its Benefits Are Priceless

Pumpkin Pie Turmeric Breakfast Smoothie - Vegan + Gluten-Free

Component of red wine, grapes can help to reduce inflammation, study finds

Poly MVA: A Novel Therapy for Increasing Energy, Repairing DNA, and Promoting Overall Health

Vitamin D supplementation extends life in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Conquer Your Email Inbox, Increase Productivity and Reduce Stress

The Significance of Selenium

Print Page
Email Article

Coffee Consumption and Risk of Stroke in Women - Source: Circulation, Feb 16, 2009

  [ 11 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By Esther Lopez-Garcia PhD, et al. • • February 23, 2009

Background: Data on the association between coffee consumption and risk of stroke are sparse. We assessed the association between coffee consumption and the risk of stroke over 24 years of follow-up in women.

Methods and Results: We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 83,076 women in the Nurses' Health Study without history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes, or cancer at baseline.

Coffee consumption was assessed first in 1980 and then repeatedly every 2 to 4 years, with follow-up through 2004.

We documented 2,280 strokes, of which 426 were hemorrhagic, 1,224 were ischemic, and 630 were undetermined.

In multivariable Cox regression models with adjustment for age, smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol intake, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, aspirin use, and dietary factors, the relative risks (RRs) of stroke across categories of coffee consumption (less than 1 cup per month, 1 per month to 4 per week, 5 to 7 per week, 2 to 3 per day, and 4 or more cups per day) were 1, 0.98 (95% CI, 0.84 to 1.15), 0.88 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.02), 0.81 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.95), and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.98) (P for trend=0.003). [Note: A relative risk of 1.0 would mean no difference in stroke incidence from those drinking less than 1 cup a month. An RR of 0.81 for those drinking 2-3 cups a day would mean the average risk of stroke is 19% less than for those drinking less than 1 cup a month, for example.]

After further adjustment for high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, and type 2 diabetes, the inverse association remained significant. The association was stronger among never and past smokers (RR for 4 or more cups a day versus <1 cup a month, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.84) than among current smokers (RR for 4 or more cups a day versus <1 cup a month, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.48).

Other drinks containing caffeine such as tea and caffeinated soft drinks were not associated with stroke.

Decaffeinated coffee was associated with a trend toward lower risk of stroke after adjustment for caffeinated coffee consumption (RR for 2 cups a day versus <1 cup a month, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.08; P for trend=0.05).

Conclusions: Long-term coffee consumption was not associated with an increased risk of stroke in women. In contrast, our data suggest that coffee consumption may modestly reduce risk of stroke.

Source: Circulation, Feb 16, 2009. Lopez-Garcia E, Rodriguez-Artalejo F, Rexrode KM, Logroscino G, Hu FB, van Dam RM. Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Barcelona, Spain; Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass; Division of Preventive Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. [E-mail:]

Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil FibroSleep™

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products

Article Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment

Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health

Natural Remedies

Three-Step Strategy to Reverse Mitochondrial Aging Three-Step Strategy to Reverse Mitochondrial Aging
D-ficient? Health Risks You Need to Know About D-ficient? Health Risks You Need to Know About
How Glutathione Can Save Your Life How Glutathione Can Save Your Life
The Most Powerful Natural Antioxidant Discovered to Date - Hydroxytyrosol The Most Powerful Natural Antioxidant Discovered to Date - Hydroxytyrosol
"It's Not Easy Being Green" - But It Is Healthy

ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
Credit Card Processing
Be the first to know about new products, special discounts and the latest health news. *New subscribers only

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map