ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

American Heart Association Renders Itself Obsolete With 1960s Dietary Advice on Coconut Oil

Is Coconut Oil Healthy? (The American Heart Association Doesn’t Think So)

Inflammation Disrupts Memory - What Can You Do to Protect Your Brain?

Health Benefits of Artichokes

Putting the Spotlight on Coriander Seed Oil

Migraines? Powdered Ginger May Help

Are Americans Really Getting Too Much Vitamin D? A Critical Look at Recent Media Warnings

Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause

Is Activated Charcoal Beneficial?

German Chamomile Oil: A Versatile Essential Oil You Should Have at Home

 
Print Page
Email Article

Women control incontinence with cognitive exercises in Loyola trial

  [ 12 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • May 11, 2009


“The therapy has allowed me to successfully recognize the link between my brain and bladder to manage my incontinence and remain virtually accident-free."

After nine years of suffering in silence and living in fear of leaving the house, Anna Raisor, 53, turned to physicians at Loyola University Health System (LUHS) for alternative measures to treat the embarrassing side effects of incontinence.

LUHS physicians enrolled Raisor in a clinical trial using cognitive therapy to manage her overactive bladder. Cognitive therapy employs deep-breathing and guided-imagery exercises that train the brain to control the bladder without medication or surgery.

Findings from this study (presented April 28 at the American Urological Association's Annual Meeting in Chicago) revealed that cognitive therapy is an effective management strategy for urge incontinence. These results also were published in the April issue of The Journal of Urology ["Home-based cognitive therapy for overactive bladder.”]

"The mind-body connection has proven to be particularly valuable for women suffering from incontinence," said study investigator Aaron Michelfelder, MD, vice chair, division of family medicine, Loyola University Health System, and associate professor, department of family medicine, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "Cognitive therapy is effective with these women, because they are motivated to make a change and regain control over their body," he said.

• Michelfelder's patients attend an initial office visit where he introduces them to cognitive therapy.

• They then listen to an audio recording with a series of relaxation and visualization exercises at home twice a day for two weeks.

• Patients track the number of incontinence episodes that they experience in a pre- and post-therapy diary.

The majority of patients, including Raisor, experienced a substantial improvement in symptoms.

"Before entering this clinical trial, I saturated seven to eight pads a day and was afraid to leave home as a result," said Raisor. "Today, I am 98 percent free of leakage. The therapy has allowed me to successfully recognize the link between my brain and bladder to manage my incontinence and remain virtually accident-free."

The study evaluated a subset of 10 patients with a mean age of 62. Patients were eligible to participate in this study, if they had a diagnosis of overactive bladder (OAB), which is the sudden and unstoppable need to urinate. They also had to be stable on all OAB treatments for the past three months before entering the study. The data revealed that the average number of urge incontinence episodes per week decreased from 38 to 12.

A very common disorder...

"Nearly one in four women suffers from a pelvic floor disorder, which includes incontinence," said study investigator Mary Pat FitzGerald, MD, a urogynecologist at Loyola University Health System, and associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "Cognitive therapy may play a vital role in a comprehensive approach to treating this disorder."

Study investigators FitzGerald and fellow Shameem Abbasy, MD, are part of a team of LUHS urogynecologists who are combining the expertise of urologists and gynecologists to transform the way women with incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders are managed.

Loyola University Health System's Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery Center [is] one of the few centers in the country that offers a single location for the diagnosis and treatment of women with pelvic floor disorders. In addition to using cognitive therapy to treat incontinence, LUHS urogynecologists have been using the robotic da Vinci™ surgical system with positive outcomes for nearly two years. LUHS was one of the first groups in Chicago to offer this type of minimally invasive robotic surgery.

Source: Maywood, Illinois - Loyola Medicine news release, Apr 28, 2009




Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Energy NADH™ 12.5mg

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid

Natural Remedies

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sleep But Were Too Tired to Ask Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sleep But Were Too Tired to Ask
Help for Soreness and Swelling: What Do Silkworms Have to Do With It? Help for Soreness and Swelling: What Do Silkworms Have to Do With It?
Curcumin - a Golden Gift of Nature with Benefits Still Untold Curcumin - a Golden Gift of Nature with Benefits Still Untold
Enhance Eyelashes Naturally Enhance Eyelashes Naturally
Vitamin E: Super Antioxidant We Only Thought We Knew Vitamin E: Super Antioxidant We Only Thought We Knew

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map