ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

SURVEY: Cognitive Impairment II

Top 3 Nutrients to Detox the Liver and Soothe Digestion

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Study bodes well for low-carb eaters

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

Potential of Quercetin in the Treatment of Melanoma

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

 
Print Page
Email Article

Alzheimer’s Intervention Studies Employing Grape Seed Extract Move to Human Trials - Mount Sinai

  [ 15 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • July 17, 2011


“This new finding holds significant promise as a preventive method or treatment, and is being tested in translational studies in Alzheimer’s disease patients.” – Dr. GM Pasinetti, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that grape seed polyphenols - a natural antioxidant - may help prevent the development or delay the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

The research, led by neurologist Giulio Maria Pasinetti, MD, PhD, at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, will be published online in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.(1)

This is the first study to evaluate the ability of grape-derived polyphenols to prevent the generation of a specific form of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide, a substance in the brain long known to cause the neurotoxicity associated with Alzheimer disease.

In partnership with a team at the University of Minnesota led by Karen Hsiao Ashe, MD, PhD, Dr. Pasinetti and his collaborators administered grape seed polyphenolic extracts to mice genetically determined to develop memory deficits and Abeta neurotoxins similar to those found in Alzheimer’s disease.

They found that the brain content of the Abeta*56, a specific form of Abeta previously implicated in the promotion of Alzheimer’s disease memory loss, was substantially reduced after treatment.

Previous studies suggest that increased consumption of grape-derived polyphenols, whose content, for example, is very high in red wine, may protect against cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s.

This new finding, showing a selective decrease in the neurotoxin Abeta*56 following grape seed-derived polyphenols treatment, corroborates those theories.

Now Being Tested in Alzheimer’s Patients

“Since naturally occurring polyphenols are also generally commercially available as nutritional supplements and have negligible adverse events even after prolonged periods of treatment, this new finding holds significant promise as a preventive method or treatment, and is being tested in translational studies in Alzheimer’s disease patients,” said Dr. Pasinetti.

Biomarker Needed for Preventive Studies

The study authors emphasize that in order for grape-derived polyphenols to be effective [in prevention], scientists need to identify a biomarker of disease that would pinpoint who is at high risk to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

“It will be critical to identify subjects who are at high risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, so that we can initiate treatments very early and possibly even in asymptomatic patients,” said Dr. Pasinetti.

“However, for Alzheimer’s disease patients who have already progressed into the initial stages of the disease, early intervention with this treatment might be beneficial as well. Our study implicating that these neurotoxins such as A?*56 in the brain are targeted by grape-derived polyphenols holds significant promise.”

This research was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health….

___

1.  Article (in press): Pasinetti GM, Ashe KH, et al, “Grape seed polyphenolic extract specifically decreases Abeta*56 in the brains of Tg2576 mice,” Vol 26, #4.

Source: Mount Sinai Medical Center news release, Jul 15, 2011




Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Optimized Curcumin Longvida® FibroSleep™


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Grape Seed Extract Grape Seed Extract
Powerful Antioxidant & Immunity Builder
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function

Natural Remedies

Research Links Green Tea to Weight Loss Research Links Green Tea to Weight Loss
Are You Obtaining the Proper Enzymes? Are You Obtaining the Proper Enzymes?
Magnesium + Malic Acid: One-Two Punch for Pain & Fatigue Magnesium + Malic Acid: One-Two Punch for Pain & Fatigue
Nutrients to Combat the Modern Stress Epidemic Nutrients to Combat the Modern Stress Epidemic
Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unlocking the Secrets of Peppermint, Acacia and Fennel Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unlocking the Secrets of Peppermint, Acacia and Fennel

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map