ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Vitamin D supplementation could ease IBS symptoms

Increase Your Magnesium Intake

Top Tips to Boost Your Immunity

11 Amazing Health Benefits of Using Baking Soda

Nicotinamide riboside shows promise for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Exercise, calcium, vitamin D, and other factors linked with fewer injurious falls

Vitamin D3 Is a Powerhouse for Your Heart

Rhodiola — A Powerful Adaptogen That Boosts Vitality and Performance, Eases Depression and Combats B...

Curcumin Supplementation May Impart Long-Term Cognitive Benefits

Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy can program obesity in children

 
Print Page
Email Article

Long-term use of pills for anxiety and sleep problems may be linked to Alzheimer's

  [ 14 votes ]   [ 1 Comment ]
www.ProHealth.com • September 11, 2014


Long-term use of pills for anxiety and sleep problems may be linked to Alzheimer's
Press Release: BMJ, Sept 9, 2014. Taking benzodiazepines -- widely prescribed drugs to treat anxiety and insomnia -- is associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, particularly for long-term users, suggests a new study.
 
The researchers warn that unwarranted long-term use should be considered a public health concern. Dementia currently affects about 36 million people worldwide and this number is expected to double every 20 years, reaching 115 million by 2015. Although a increased risk of dementia has been identified in benzodiazepine users, the nature of this association, whether causal or not, remains unclear.
 
So a team of researchers based in France and Canada set out to investigate the relationship between the risk of Alzheimer's disease and benzodiazepine exposure over a several years, as well as a potential dose-response relationship.
 
Using data from the Quebec health insurance program database (RAMQ), they tracked the development of Alzheimer's disease in a sample of elderly residents living in Quebec, Canada who had been prescribed benzodiazepines.
 
Over a period of at least six years, they identified 1,796 cases of Alzheimer's disease. They then compared each case with 7,184 healthy people matched for age, sex, and duration of follow-up.
 
Results show that past use of benzodiazepines for three months or more was associated with an increased risk (up to 51%) of Alzheimer's disease. The strength of association increased with longer exposure and with use of long-acting benzodiazepines rather than short-acting ones.
 
Further adjustment for symptoms that might indicate the start of dementia, such as anxiety, depression or sleep disorders, did not meaningfully alter the results.

In this large case-control study, benzodiazepine use was associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, say the authors. They emphasise that the nature of the link is still not definitive, but say the stronger association seen with long-term exposures "reinforces the suspicion of a possible direct association, even if benzodiazepine use might also be an early marker of a condition associated with an increased risk of dementia."
 
Benzodiazepines are "indisputably valuable tools for managing anxiety disorders and transient insomnia" they write, but warn that treatments "should be of short duration and not exceed three months."
 
They conclude that their findings are of "major importance for public health, especially considering the prevalence and chronicity of benzodiazepine use in elderly populations and the high and increasing incidence of dementia in developed countries."
 
In view of the evidence, they conclude that "it is now crucial to encourage physicians to carefully balance the benefits and risks when initiating or renewing a treatment with benzodiazepines and related products in elderly patients."
 
In an accompanying editorial, Professor Kristine Yaffe of the University of California at San Francisco and Professor Malaz Boustani of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, point out that in 2012 the American Geriatrics Society updated its list of inappropriate drugs for older adults to include benzodiazepines, precisely because of their unwanted cognitive side effects.
 
Yet almost 50% of older adults continue to use these drugs, they say. And without any formal monitoring system, the potential long term consequences on brain health are likely to be missed, adding to the growing prevalence of cognitive impairment among older people, they suggest.
 
Given the expanding numbers of older people likely to be treated with several drugs at a time, and/or who are at risk of Alzheimer's disease, this gap needs to be plugged, they say.
 
Journal References:

1) S. Billioti de Gage, Y. Moride, T. Ducruet, T. Kurth, H. Verdoux, M. Tournier, A. Pariente, B. Begaud. Benzodiazepine use and risk of Alzheimer's disease: case-control study. BMJ, 2014; 349 (sep09 2): g5205 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.g5205
 
2) K. Yaffe, M. Boustani. Benzodiazepines and risk of Alzheimer's disease. BMJ, 2014; 349 (sep09 6): g5312 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.g5312



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
FibroSleep™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Energy NADH™ 12.5mg


Article Comments Post a Comment

study could've been done better.....
Posted by: jenunsa
Oct 1, 2014
Instead of comparing people who took the meds for sleep/anxiety problems with healthy people, they should have compared the people who took meds for sleep/anxiety problems with other people who have the same problems but took no meds. That way we'd actually know if the drugs caused the dementia or if it was the sleep/anxiety problems that caused it. OR...that whatever causes the sleep/anxiety problems is also the cause for the dementia.
Reply Reply
 
Optimized Curcumin Longvida with Omega-3

Featured Products

Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get Energized with Malic Acid & Magnesium
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid

Natural Remedies

Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker
Live Without Anxiety or Stress Live Without Anxiety or Stress
Probiotic Mint Promotes Healthy Gums & Teeth, Freshens Breath and Whitens Teeth Probiotic Mint Promotes Healthy Gums & Teeth, Freshens Breath and Whitens Teeth
Aching Muscles? Top 10 Nutrients to Take Back Your Life Aching Muscles? Top 10 Nutrients to Take Back Your Life
Astaxanthin - A Little-Known but Power-Packed Nutrient Astaxanthin - A Little-Known but Power-Packed Nutrient

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2018 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map