ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

10 Fibro-Friendly Foods with a Bonus: Beautiful Skin

Fight Back! Win the War Being Waged Against Your Immune System

Studies Show that Magnesium L-threonate Improves Brain Plasticity, Leading to Direct and Significant...

The role of microbiota and intestinal permeability in the pathophysiology of autoimmune and neuroimm...

Clary Sage Oil May Be Pricey, but Its Benefits Are Priceless

Component of red wine, grapes can help to reduce inflammation, study finds

Poly MVA: A Novel Therapy for Increasing Energy, Repairing DNA, and Promoting Overall Health

Acupressure reduced fatigue in breast cancer survivors

Pumpkin Pie Turmeric Breakfast Smoothie - Vegan + Gluten-Free

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Print Page
Email Article

Depression More Dangerous for Elderly Men than Women?

  [ 230 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ] • November 27, 2002

By Ann Quigley, Contributing Writer

Health Behavior News Service

Depression is more dangerous for elderly men than women, with depression starting in old age representing the greatest risk for men, according to a long-term study.

"Depression may be an early sign of impending physical decline," says study author Kaarin Anstey, Ph.D., of the Center for Mental Health Research at Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. "Or it may incur a physiological response that predisposes individuals to cardiovascular disease or cancer."

Anstey and co-author Mary A. Luszcz, Ph.D., of the School of Psychology and Center for Aging Studies at Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia, analyzed data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging, focusing on individuals aged 70 or older. More than 1,900 participants completed a questionnaire measuring depression in 1992; a subset of these participants completed it in 1994. The researchers tracked the health of the participants until 2000.

Participants were classified as having "incident depression" if their questionnaire scores indicated they were depressed the second time they took the test but not the first time. They received a classification of "remitted depression" if their depression had relented the second time they took the test and "chronic depression" if their scores were high on both occasions.

After taking into account factors such as smoking, alcohol and medical conditions, depression was associated with mortality for men but not women, the researchers found.

"Our findings confirm previous studies showing that late-life depression occurs more often in women, but has greater negative outcomes for men," says Anstey.

The significant effect of depression on male mortality was small but "robust," suggesting that depression may play a role in causing health changes in men, according to the study. Incident depression had the strongest association with death for men. The effects of chronic and remitted depression were not statistically significant when the researchers took medical conditions into account.

The lack of a statistically significant association between chronic depression and mortality may relate to chronically depressed participants skewing results by dropping out between the first and second questionnaires. The effects of chronic depression in this study are probably underestimated because of these dropouts, according to the study.

The finding that remitted depression was not associated with mortality "suggests that treating depression in very old adults may reduce the risk of mortality," says Anstey. The study results are published in the November/December issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

The researchers suggest that depression may be a precursor of cardiovascular disease or dementia, or may occur in concert with these conditions.

This study was partly funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Clinical Research Fellowship, the South Australian Health Commission, the Australian Rotary Health Research Fund and by a grant from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil FibroSleep™ Ultra ATP+, Double Strength

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products

Article Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment

Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength

Natural Remedies

Front Line Defense Against Colds & Flu - Support for Healthy Immune System Balance Front Line Defense Against Colds & Flu - Support for Healthy Immune System Balance
The Fast-Acting Solution for Healthy Digestive Function The Fast-Acting Solution for Healthy Digestive Function
Carry a Massage Therapist in Your Pocket Carry a Massage Therapist in Your Pocket
Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones
Energy Breakthrough - One Fibromyalgia Patient’s Fortuitous Discovery Energy Breakthrough - One Fibromyalgia Patient’s Fortuitous Discovery

ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
Credit Card Processing
Be the first to know about new products, special discounts and the latest health news. *New subscribers only

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map