ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Scientifically-designed fasting diet lowers risks for major diseases

More evidence for calorie restriction’s longevity effect

Supplementation with vitamin D associated with improved testosterone, erectile function among middle...

A Little Zinc Goes a Long Way

Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of chronic headache

VIDEO: The Best Brain Foods That Help Increase Your Memory!

Get the Most From Your Green Tea

Iron (And More) For Lasting, Natural Energy

Metabolic syndrome increases the need for vitamin E

Supplement combo improves bone density, mood, in postmenopausal women

 
Print Page
Email Article

Slowing Alzheimer’s Disease: Blueberries, New Thrills for Those Over the Hill

  [ 50 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By Press Release of National Institute on Aging • www.ProHealth.com • September 15, 1999


For centuries, people have enjoyed blueberries for their flavor and color. In a new research study, animals fed a blueberry extract diet, rich in naturally-derived antioxidants, showed fewer age-related motor changes and outperformed their study counterparts on memory tests. Indeed, blueberries and other foods containing antioxidants may act to protect the body against damage from oxidative stress, one of several biological processes implicated in aging and in the development of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture funded the study.In the study, three groups of older rats were fed an 8-week-long diet supplemented with fruit or vegetable extracts with potential antioxidant effects. A fourth group of animals did not receive the special diet. The group of animals that received the supplements showed some improvement on key indicators of age-related decline.The study was conducted by James Joseph, Ph.D. of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston, and Paula C. Bickford, Ph.D. of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Denver. The study results appear in the September 15, 1999, issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.The animals that received supplements were given either blueberry, strawberry, or spinach extracts.

Investigators found that the group of rats that was fed blueberry supplements came out on top in tests of balance and coordination. The two groups given strawberry or bueberry supplements showed the most compelling evidence of protection against oxidative stress in their brains. On tests of working memory, all three groups receiving supplements outperformed their control counterparts. fn addition, the groups receiving supplements all showed signs of the presence of vitamin E, a key antioxidant, in their brains.

"The exciting finding from this study is the potential reversal of some age-related impairments in both memory and motor coordination, especially with blueberry supplements," said Molly Wagster, Ph.D., a Health Scientist Administrator with the NIA's Neuroscience and Neurospsychology of Aging Program. "For these animals at least, investigators were able to produce a noticeable improvement within a relatively short period of time. A next important step in the research will be to see if the improvements are long lasting. "When a cell converts oxygen into energy, tiny molecules called free radicals are made. When produced in normal amounts, free radicals work to rid the body of harmful toxins, thereby keeping it healthy. When produced in toxic amounts, however, free radicals damage the body's cellular machinery, resulting in cell death and tissue damage. This process is called oxidativestress. "Whether results found in this study will also prove true for humans remains to be seen,"says Marcelle Morrison-Bogorad, Ph.D., who directs the NIA's Neuroscience and Neuropsychology of Aging Program.

"The only way to determine whether particular food ingredients actually work to slow age-related cognitive decline in humans as well is to conduct controlled clinical trials." The NIA has recently funded additions to two ongoing clinical trials testing whether a number of over-the-counter agents, including antioxidants such as vitamin E, influence the rate of cognitive decline in older women.Plant chemicals, called phytochemicals, are present in fruits and vegetables and may have additional beneficial properties,5 beyond the antioxidant activity. The authors believe that the phytochemicals present in blueberries, strawberries, and spinach may have properties that increase cell membrane fluidity, allowing important nutrients and chemical signals to pass in and out of the cell, thereby reducing inflammatory processes in tissues.

Recent studies suggest that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables---natural dietary sources of antioxidants--may have a beneficial anti-cancer effect. Orange and yellow vegetables, fruits, and whole grains are all rich in natural antioxidants. Several currently popular substances, including vitamin E, beta carotene, vitamin C, and selenium, are also thought to have antioxidant effects in the body, but how they actually work is not entirely understood. Scientists are studying the effectiveness of these and other agents for their antioxidant properties and for their ability to protect cells against damage and death associated with oxidative stress.When we hear these promising results, we also may hear an echo of our wise mothers' voices-Eat your fruits and vegetables," says Dr. Wagster.

The National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), located in Bethesda, Maryland, leads the Federal effort supporting basic, clinical, epidemiological and social research on aging and the special needs of older people.

Source:
National Institute of Aging
Press Release
September 15, 1999

Reference:
Joseph, J.A., Shukitt-Hale B., Denisova, N.A. Bielinksi D., Martin, A., McEwen, J.J., and Bickford, P.C. "Reversals of Age- Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation." Journal of Neuroscience, September 15, 1999, Vol. 19, No. 18, pp. 8114-812



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg FibroSleep™ Optimized Curcumin Longvida®

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength

Natural Remedies

Physically and Mentally Exhausted? How to Restore Energy at Its Source Physically and Mentally Exhausted? How to Restore Energy at Its Source
Fatigue & Fibro Fog: Could You Have a B-12 Deficiency? Fatigue & Fibro Fog: Could You Have a B-12 Deficiency?
Prepare Yourself for Cold & Flu Season Prepare Yourself for Cold & Flu Season
Breakthrough Form of Magnesium Enhances Memory and Cognitive Function Breakthrough Form of Magnesium Enhances Memory and Cognitive Function
Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map