ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Is Magnesium the Missing Link in Your Heart Healthy Routine?

A Little Zinc Goes a Long Way

More evidence for calorie restriction’s longevity effect

Supplementation with vitamin D associated with improved testosterone, erectile function among middle...

Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of chronic headache

VIDEO: The Best Brain Foods That Help Increase Your Memory!

Iron (And More) For Lasting, Natural Energy

Get the Most From Your Green Tea

Affordable Care Act made cancer screening more accessible for millions, study finds

Metabolic syndrome increases the need for vitamin E

 
Print Page
Email Article

Genetically Engineered Mice Show Characteristic Signs Of Alzheimer's, Could Be Ideal Tool For Testing New Therapies

  [ Not Yet Rated ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By Press Release by the Univ of Ca San Francisco • www.ProHealth.com • August 31, 1998


Laboratory mice genetically engineered to have human apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) in the brain, a protein associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, show learning and memory problems strikingly similar to those seen in human Alzheimer's patients, according to researchers at the J. David Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco.

People who inherit the gene for apoE4 are known to be at much greater risk of Alzheimer's than people who inherit the gene for the more common form of this protein, called apoE3. To characterize the effects of these proteins on cognitive functions, the Gladstone researchers developed entirely new strains of mice that express human apoE3 or apoE4 in the brain instead of mouse apoE. The researchers then observed the behavior of these mice in a variety of controlled laboratory situations that require specific cognitive skills.

The apoE4 mice performed poorly in tests requiring spatial learning and memory skills and were less likely to explore their environment than the apoE3 mice. The effects were most noticeable in mice that were older and female. "We are very excited about these results because they mimic in several respects what is seen in humans with Alzheimer's disease," said Lennart Mucke, MD, director of the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, UCSF associate professor of neurology, and senior author of the study.

"Alzheimer's typically comes on with advancing age, and women who have apoE4 appear to be at particularly high risk for the disease," said Jacob Raber, Ph.D., a staff research scientist at the Gladstone and first author on the study. The newly engineered apoE4 mice could serve as a valuable tool for testing potential therapies for this devastating disease, which affects some four million Americans. "This is the first model in which we were able to simulate the detrimental effects of human apoE4 on brain function," Mucke said. "That should put us in a good position to test out treatments to combat these detrimental effects."

The work was conducted by investigators at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, a major new research enterprise based at the San Francisco General Hospital campus of UCSF. The results are published in the Sept. 1 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. In one experiment, mice had to learn the location of a hidden target in a maze that tests their ability to remember and process spatial information. Similar skills are strongly affected in Alzheimer's patients, who often get lost because they have trouble finding their way home.

ApoE3 mice learned how to find the hidden target with relative ease, whereas their apoE4 counterparts had difficulty with the exercise, and some never found the target at all even after repeated tries. Consistent with the age dependence of Alzheimer's disease, only older apoE4 mice showed deficits in learning and memory, whereas young apoE4 mice were not impaired.

In another experiment, mice were placed in an open field inside a cage, and their movements were monitored with motion sensors. Older apoE4 mice showed much less exploratory curiosity in this test than age-matched apoE3 mice. The investigators speculate that these findings might also relate to Alzheimer's patients, who often lose interest in their environment and abandon activities that once engaged them.

In both experiments, the researchers noticed a distinct difference in behavior between female and male mice, with the females experiencing a higher level of impairment. These results are consistent with clinical studies by other investigators which suggest that apoE4 increases Alzheimer's risk and decreases responsiveness to treatments more strongly in women than in men. The researchers already have begun to manipulate the levels of apoE4 in the brains of these mice to see what impact these changes might have on their behavior. Mucke said it may be possible to design drugs that inhibit apoE4 or simulate apoE3 to counteract the neurological effects of Alzheimer's. "The real test of this model will come when we can test treatment strategies and see if they will work in humans," he said.

In addition to Mucke and Raber, the researchers on the study, all of the Gladstone Institutes, included Derek Wong, research associate; postdoctoral fellows Manuel Buttini, PhD, Matthias Orth, MD, PhD, and Stefano Bellosta, PhD; Robert E. Pitas, PhD, UCSF professor of pathology and Gladstone senior investigator; and Robert W. Mahley, MD, PhD, UCSF professor of pathology and medicine and president of the Gladstone Institutes. The research was supported by the Gladstone Institutes and Cambridge Neuroscience in Cambridge, Mass.

Source: Univ. of Calif. San Francisco Press Release: August 31, 1998

Contact:, Corinna Kaarlela, corinna@itsa.ucsf.edu, (415) 476-3804



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Energy NADH™ 12.5mg

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength

Natural Remedies

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sleep But Were Too Tired to Ask Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sleep But Were Too Tired to Ask
Undenatured Type II Collagen - Chicken Soup for Your Joints Undenatured Type II Collagen - Chicken Soup for Your Joints
Restore Youthful Cognition and Well-Being Restore Youthful Cognition and Well-Being
Prepare Yourself for Cold & Flu Season Prepare Yourself for Cold & Flu Season
Help for Soreness and Swelling: What Do Silkworms Have to Do With It? Help for Soreness and Swelling: What Do Silkworms Have to Do With It?

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map