ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Friendly User's Guide for the Timing of Nutritional Supplements

The Health Benefits of Manuka Honey

Increase Your Magnesium Intake

Vitamin D supplementation could ease IBS symptoms

Top Tips to Boost Your Immunity

11 Amazing Health Benefits of Using Baking Soda

Nicotinamide riboside shows promise for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Exercise, calcium, vitamin D, and other factors linked with fewer injurious falls

Vitamin D3 Is a Powerhouse for Your Heart

Curcumin Supplementation May Impart Long-Term Cognitive Benefits

 
Print Page
Email Article

Neuromuscular Strain in ME/CFS

  [ 7 votes ]   [ 4 Comments ]
By ME Research UK • www.ProHealth.com • August 6, 2016


Neuromuscular Strain in ME/CFS
Reprinted with the kind permission of ME Research UK.

Neuromuscular Strains

In the diagnosis and assessment of ME/CFS, there is a great need for simple objective measures that can differentiate the condition from other chronic illnesses, particularly after 24 or 48 hours when the effects of exercise can become most apparent. To date, researchers at Antwerp University Hospital have found upper limb muscle recovery is slower in ME/CFS patients (read more), and they have also shown that ‘timed-loaded standing’ with a dumbbell (intended to simulate the performance of the torso during everyday activities) is shorter in women with ME/CFS than others, revealing a relative lack of endurance in the muscles of the trunk and arm (read more).

Similarly, an ongoing program of research at Johns Hopkins University has also shown that simple physiological challenges can have abnormal effects. These researchers have uncovered preliminary evidence that ME/CFS patients’ symptoms can be aggravated by ‘neuromuscular strain’, and that young people with the illness have more areas of the body with an ‘abnormal range of motion’ than healthy youngsters. In fact, in the young patients, they found that adding a longitudinal strain to the nerves and soft tissues provoked symptoms, suggesting that the nervous system and connective tissues of the ME/CFS patients is less compliant, i.e. more sensitive to mechanical movement, than normal. Continuing its investigations, the group’s most recent report describes work on 60 people with ME/CFS and 20 controls, who underwent either a real neuromuscular strain for 15 minutes  (passive supine straight leg raise or SLR) or a sham leg raise that minimised strain. The SLR, which involves raising and holding up one leg while the person lies on their back on an examination table, is most often used for low-back examinations; in fact, it is a test of nerve root irritation, most often seen in sciatica or lumber disc herniation (read more). In this case, however, it was used only to give a mild to moderate strain to the muscles and nerves.

In the diagnosis and assessment of ME/CFS, there is a great need for simple objective measures that can differentiate the condition from other chronic illnesses, particularly after 24 or 48 hours when the effects of exercise can become most apparent. To date, researchers at Antwerp University Hospital have found upper limb muscle recovery is be slower in ME/CFS patients (read more), and they have also shown that ‘timed-loaded standing’ with a dumbbell (intended to simulate the performance of the torso during everyday activities) is shorter in women with ME/CFS than others, revealing a relative lack of endurance in the muscles of the trunk and arm (read more).

Similarly, an ongoing program of research at Johns Hopkins University has also shown that simple physiological challenges can have abnormal effects. These researchers have uncovered preliminary evidence that ME/CFS patients’ symptoms can be aggravated by ‘neuromuscular strain’, and that young people with the illness have more areas of the body with an ‘abnormal range of motion’ than healthy youngsters. In fact, in the young patients, they found that adding a longitudinal strain to the nerves and soft tissues provoked symptoms, suggesting that the nervous system and connective tissues of the ME/CFS patients is less compliant, i.e. more sensitive to mechanical movement, than normal. Continuing its investigations, the group’s most recent report describes work on 60 people with ME/CFS and 20 controls, who underwent either a real neuromuscular strain for 15 minutes  (passive supine straight leg raise or SLR) or a sham leg raise that minimised strain. The SLR, which involves raising and holding up one leg while the person lies on their back on an examination table, is most often used for low-back examinations; in fact, it is a test of nerve root irritation, most often seen in sciatica or lumber disc herniation (read more). In this case, however, it was used only to give a mild to moderate strain to the muscles and nerves.

Prof Kevin Fontaine, a co-author of the report, says that the findings “have practical implications for understanding why exercise and the activities of daily living might be capable of provoking CFS symptoms…If simply holding up the leg of someone with CFS to a degree that produces a mild to moderate strain is capable of provoking their symptoms, prolonged or excessive muscle strain beyond the usual range of motion that occurs during daily activities might also produce symptom flares.”

Overall, the results suggest that increased mechanical sensitivity may be a factor in the symptoms people with ME/CFS experience after even mild exertion, and the researchers’ next steps are to tease out the particular effects of strains to muscles and nerves, and to elucidate whether neural or muscular factors predominate. Day-to-day impairments in basic functioning of people with ME/CFS – which can be easily measured objectively in the consulting room, and can be provoked by simple manoeuvres like  the SLR – tend to be overlooked by healthcare professionals today, but may well have diagnostic or pathophysiological value.




ME Research UK commissions high-quality biomedical investigation into the causes, consequences and treatment of ME/CFS. The charity’s mission is to "Energise ME Research." Visit ME Research at http://www.meresearch.org.uk/.




Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® FibroSleep™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™


Article Comments Post a Comment

CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME
Posted by: LauraSavona
Aug 24, 2016
My brother is suffering with this illness, he is so tired and run down, I am very afraid for him. He has a family, a little girl and two older sons and I do not want him to miss out on seeing them all grow up and get out on their own! He is on so many different drug protocols which probably add to his demeanor! Is there a cure for CFS, is there one in the works, I love him very much and I can bear the thought of anything worse happening to him, our mother couldn't survive it. What, if anything can I do to follow-up with this? Could you let me know please? Thank you for your time & consideration...
Reply Reply

 
Your brother and this disease
Posted by: MaschelleMEcfs
Aug 25, 2016
I too have CFS. I am now a single mother with three young adult children and a 15 year old daughter who was 5 when the mother she knew began to change in ways that frightened her. Now, she can't remember me as a healthy, active, fun loving mother that she used to brave the Alaska Bush with. Just us. I didn't know what was happening to me and neither did my doctors. I had no help so I pushed myself to keep going, until my body of brain gave out and I would fall into a state that looks like sleep, but it's not true, restorative sleep. It's more like losing consciousness with no forwarding...and I will surface enough to feel horrible pain and be aware I needed help, but I couldn't wake, or move. I'd sink back into blackness. It's terrifying to be the person who is experiencing this, and terrifying for the child that cannot wake you up. There is no test or treatment for this disease except radical acceptance that you will get worse if you keep pushing, so you must be on as much bed rest as possible. If that is done in the first 3 years of onset there is a better chance of remission or recovery. If you are not aware of this necessity, the prognosis is not good. I was forced to do too much for 2 years, then I got a diagnosis and a caregiver which allows me to stay at home. This was in 2008. Being single I have had to take care of my daughter and when I couldn't she spent days with relatives while I cried from the pain and floated in and out of unwanted "sleep". That was in 2008. Now I'm almost totally bedridden and can't be upright for more than 5 minutes. It's been this way for 3 years now...and all because I had to push myself. Now I can't "push" through anything and thank God my child is older and can cook and clean and care for her major needs. She cooks for me. She is a wonderful young woman! I know this isn't a fun answer to your question. But it's important to be aware of the reality of what this disease can do...so don't push it. I encourage you to research and educate yourself on recent discoveries and studies. The Institute of Medicine released their findings from the first large scale study on CFS (I have ME-CFS, not all CFS patients have ME) in October of 2015. It's an important report! Our government in the US is not taking the Institute of Medicine's suggestions to heart,cand have not included the findings in educational materials for doctors. Congress cut the meager funding we'd been allowed for research into this illness. They literally cut it out of the budget. We got $0 for research. Hay Fever, however, was funded generously. Become educated and advocate for your ill brother. Research 1st is a fabulous place to get your accurate facts with no political or special interests spin. They report the latest, ongoing and upcoming studies. there is a bio bank patients are submitting their own samples to for researchers to study in large studies and it is resulting groundbreaking findings! That would be the best a good sister can do. It is what we desperately need. Good luck!! I hope his story does not come to mirror my own. He just rest...even if he feels good! Otherwise he will end up in a push-crash cycle that has serious repercussions.

 


In answer to the lady asking if there is a cure for CFS
Posted by: CFS1990
Aug 25, 2016
I've had CFS for 26 years. NO - there is not a cure - or a valid treatment at this time. Anyone, physician or otherwise - who tells you different does not know what they are talking about. The stats have changed over the years, but most people do not recover. When I first started dealing with CFS, there were reports of people getting better at the 6 year mark. Didn't happen for me. A small number of patients spontaneously recover for no apparent reason. I spent years looking for answers, treatments etc. with no success. The Nightingale Institute of Canada does nothing but Research on CFS/ME and gave me the best and most realistic answers and prognosis. Some people claim a variety of things help-maybe for some - not me. Most doctors still have little or no knowledge about CFS. A friend at church actually believes she had CFS "for a little while" cos her physician told her! Nevermind that a major criteria for diagnosis is to have had it for AT LEAST 6 months! I came across this ProHealth site by accident and will say they have some helpful information & I appreciate that. But go to http://www.nightingale.ca/ for the most comprehensive and accurate information. I was lucky enough to attend a seminar by their founder, Dr. Byron Hyde at the beginning of my CFS and everyone there (including children) kept *gasping* at everything he said cos so many things finally made sense to us! I truly believed there was light at the end of the tunnel for 20 years! I stayed hopeful and optimistic, probably due to my Faith. But I have since given up. I do not believe anything worthwhile will be discovered and proven effective in my lifetime. I'd love to be wrong, but after 26 years - it's highly unlikely. So, if there is any advice to be given for your brother or new CFS sufferers - it is to be realistic and try to ADAPT. The more you physically fight - usually the worse you feel. Try new things if the are medically recommended but forget the fads. That's all they are. Don't take any one person's opinion, diagnosis etc as absolute - including mine. But for the long haul - I guarantee you that ADAPTING is the most helpful thing you can do. Do NOT do things you know will exhaust you! For me - talking out loud is disastrous as it spikes my fever! I could go on and on but this much typing is already wearing me out. It's good to remain cheerful and hopeful as long as you can. But don't fool yourself and don't play guinea pig. Don't feel bad about needing huge amounts of rest/sleep!! It is actually the BEST thing you can do for yourself. It is supremely IMPORTANT that you do NOT try to PUSH through CFS!! It can't be done! That's a Medically Documented proven FACT. It can make you permanently Worse! Don't try to be a Hero or Martyr! There are tons of info out there but you cannot read it all - don't even try! Lastly, if you try Supplements - ONLY take ONE at a time for about a month! Your system is compromised and you need to be careful to not get sick and need to know what does or does not work before trying a second supplement. That takes time! MY system could not handle any of them! I took double doses of Iron for a while and after it was in my system, I felt a tiny "lift" for about 45 minutes - then it was gone. But soon it began to cause severely painful abdominal cramping!! I tried coated pills, delayed release pills, etc but nothing worked. Now I can't even take a multi-vitamin with iron. Actually I can't even take a multi-vitamin period. Did not mean to type this much at all. Intended a quick - short response to the question. But after 26 years, my experience sort of floods out of me ha. I do hope, as bleak as I've painted this - that it may be of some help. Good luck!!
Reply Reply

 
PS - to my previous comments
Posted by: CFS1990
Aug 25, 2016
I just had to say how ironic it is that while I was typing my comments - another lady posted hers -- and SHE also expressed how important it is NOT to PUSH yourself if you have CFS and/or ME - or Fibromyalgia. They are all closely related. The other lady is absolutely correct in her remarks about Government funding too! It's ridiculous! I think the other lady and I say much the same thing - which is as it should be. The best thing you can do for your brother is to make sure he rests as much as he needs to! And not let him do things you both know will exhaust him. I realize with a family this is extremely difficult. So educate the whole family to the extent they can digest it. Having a Support group of family/friends definitely helps! I can't tell you how many times my best friend has got groceries and meds for me - even taking my dogs to the vet. I used to say CFS took 95% of my energy away. 5 years ago - it took the other 5%! I, also, am completely debilitated and in bed 24/7. I never do this much typing any more - but I felt so bad for you wanting to help your brother - and knowing there's so little you or anyone can do. Just make sure your brother knows you don't "expect" anything of him. You don't say if he's married - just that he has kids - so THEY need to be educated as well. I just noticed you saying "your mother" couldn't survive it. Does that mean she had it too? or that she couldn't deal with your brother's illness? So sorry either way. One last time - everyone has to ADAPT!! Don't be misled by false hope. Don't agonize over not being able to do much - it's a waste of energy. Look for little moments of joy - they do exist :)

 

 
Optimized Curcumin Longvida with Omega-3

Featured Products

FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get Energized with Malic Acid & Magnesium
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength

Natural Remedies

Cell-Charging Compound Gives Steady Energy to Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Patients Cell-Charging Compound Gives Steady Energy to Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Patients
Repair Damaged Mitochondria and Reduce Fatigue Up to 45% Repair Damaged Mitochondria and Reduce Fatigue Up to 45%
Improve Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health with Omega-7 Improve Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health with Omega-7
The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS
A Hard-Working Molecule that May Help Ease Pain & Brighten Mood A Hard-Working Molecule that May Help Ease Pain & Brighten Mood

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2018 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map