ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Fighting Heartburn and Gerd Naturally – And Safely!

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

Curcumin Reverses the Cellular Damage of Chronic Stress

Probiotics improve cognition in Alzheimer's patients

The Onion: Cancer Fighter and Food Preserver

 
Print Page
Email Article

Placebo Appears To Alter Brain Function In Individuals With Major Depression

  [ 20 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • February 6, 2002





LOS ANGELES, CA -- January 2, 2002 -- Researchers at the University of California are the first to report altered brain function in people who respond favorably to placebo treatment for major depression. In addition, the findings show these changes are different than those found in people who respond to antidepressant medication.

The study, appearing in the January edition of the peer-reviewed American Journal of Psychiatry, used quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) imaging to examine brain electrical activity in patients treated for depression with placebo, and others treated with antidepressant medication. The researchers examined QEEG cordance, a measure associated with blood flow in the brain.


Patients who responded to placebo showed increased activity in the brain’s prefrontal cortex, while those who responded to medication showed suppressed activity in that area. Scientists have linked the prefrontal cortex to processes affecting many diverse areas of cognition, including working memory, information processing, behavioral organization and attention.


"People have known for years that if you give placebos to patients with depression or other illnesses, many of them will get better," said Dr. Andrew Leuchter, lead author and director of adult psychiatry at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital. "What this study shows, for the first time, is that people who get better on placebo have a change in brain function, just as surely as people who get better on medication. We now know that placebo is, very definitely, an active treatment condition."


These findings and future research in this area eventually could help determine which treatments work best in individual patients, and also could aid development of new medications. In the meantime, the results demonstrate why people struggling with depression should stay the course when seeking an effective treatment.


"These findings show us that there are different pathways to improvement for people suffering from depression," Dr. Leuchter said. "Medications are effective, but there may be other ways to help people get better. If we can identify what some of the mechanisms are that help people get better with placebo, we may be able to make treatments more effective."


The study enrolled 51 individuals with major depression. Researchers assigned each to one of two independent, nine-week, double-blind placebo-controlled studies, using either fluoxetine or venlafaxine as the active medication.


A series of five QEEG recordings were performed on each individual during the course of treatment. In addition, each individual’s condition was monitored weekly by a research nurse to address safety concerns about dispensing placebo alone to patients with significant depression.


After nine weeks, the blind was broken and subjects were classified as medication responders, placebo responders, medication non-responders or placebo non-responders.


Overall, 52 percent (13 of 25) of the subjects receiving antidepressant medication responded to treatment, while 38 percent (10 of 26) of those receiving placebos responded.


SOURCE: University of California - Los Angeles



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Energy NADH™ 12.5mg FibroSleep™


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils

Natural Remedies

Reversing Neurodegeneration with a New Magnesium Compound Reversing Neurodegeneration with a New Magnesium Compound
Sunshine Vitamin Has D-lightful Health Benefits Sunshine Vitamin Has D-lightful Health Benefits
How to Jump-start and Sustain Energy Production in CFS How to Jump-start and Sustain Energy Production in CFS
Fighting Fatigue with Ground-breaking French Oak Wood Extract Fighting Fatigue with Ground-breaking French Oak Wood Extract
Priming Your Immune System for Cold & Flu Season Priming Your Immune System for Cold & Flu Season

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map