ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

10 Fibro-Friendly Foods with a Bonus: Beautiful Skin

Studies Show that Magnesium L-threonate Improves Brain Plasticity, Leading to Direct and Significant...

Clary Sage Oil May Be Pricey, but Its Benefits Are Priceless

Pumpkin Pie Turmeric Breakfast Smoothie - Vegan + Gluten-Free

Component of red wine, grapes can help to reduce inflammation, study finds

Poly MVA: A Novel Therapy for Increasing Energy, Repairing DNA, and Promoting Overall Health

Vitamin D supplementation extends life in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Conquer Your Email Inbox, Increase Productivity and Reduce Stress

The Significance of Selenium

Print Page
Email Article

Potted plants aren't the answer to sick building syndrome

  [ 22 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By Matt Walker • • January 1, 2000

If you want to improve the quality of the air in your home or office, forget about buying a few indoor plants. You'd have to make the place look like the Palm House at Kew Gardens to have even the slightest impact, claims an Australian researcher.

A variety of organic molecules known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been found in office air and linked to sick building syndrome, a range of symptoms that leaves people feeling tired, irritable and unwell but with no specific illness. Aside from obvious moves such as improving ventilation and removing sources of VOCs, potted plants have been touted as a potential solution to the problem-although evidence that they remove pollutants is sparse. "Everybody believes plants are the answer to sick buildings and indoor air pollution," says environmental scientist Peter Dingle of Murdoch University in Western Australia. "It's one of the great urban myths."

To test whether this particular myth had any basis in fact, Dingle and his colleagues examined the effects of plants on levels of formaldehyde, a toxic chemical that can irritate the eyes, skin and throat, and is thought to cause nausea, dizziness and lethargy at levels as low as 50 parts per billion (ppb). It may also aggravate asthma and hay fever and is a potential carcinogen.

Dingle and his colleagues measured formaldehyde levels in offices where the occupants had complained of poor air quality. As well as studying 18 office buildings in Perth, the researchers studied 20 temporary buildings on their university campus. These are typically built using major sources of formaldehyde-pressed wood products such as plywood and some types of foam insulation.
Average levels of formaldehyde ranged from 10 ppb to 78 ppb in the office buildings. But concentrations in the temporary cabins ranged from 420 ppb to 2110 ppb-far in excess of the WHO's safety standard of 82 ppb.

Dingle then set up five experimental cabins with a floor space of 8 square metres each. Into each, he placed five plants every two days until there were 20 plants in the cabin. With up to 10 plants in a cabin, formaldehyde concentrations remained unchanged. With 20 plants, average levels of formaldehyde were only reduced from 856 ppb to 761 ppb. If potted plants do help treat sick building syndrome, Dingle concludes, the effect is psychological. "They really make a place more comfortable and beautiful, but they do not clean the air of pollutants to any significant degree."

However, Jeff Llewellyn, an expert on indoor air quality with Britain's Building Research Establishment in Watford, says that the importance of such psychological factors shouldn't be underestimated. He also points out that the ability of plants to remove other pollutants hasn't been adequately studied: "Formaldehyde is but one pollutant."

Source: Matt Walker New Scientist issue 15th January 2000.

Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ FibroSleep™ Ultra ATP+, Double Strength

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products

Article Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment

Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength

Natural Remedies

Block Acid Reflux to Prevent Esophageal Problems! Block Acid Reflux to Prevent Esophageal Problems!
Cell-Charging Compound Gives Steady Energy to Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Patients Cell-Charging Compound Gives Steady Energy to Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Patients
The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS
The Brain Boosting and Fatigue Fighting B-12 The Brain Boosting and Fatigue Fighting B-12
The Fast-Acting Solution for Healthy Digestive Function The Fast-Acting Solution for Healthy Digestive Function

ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
Credit Card Processing
Be the first to know about new products, special discounts and the latest health news. *New subscribers only

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map