ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Is Coconut Oil Healthy? (The American Heart Association Doesn’t Think So)

American Heart Association Renders Itself Obsolete With 1960s Dietary Advice on Coconut Oil

Inflammation Disrupts Memory - What Can You Do to Protect Your Brain?

Health Benefits of Artichokes

Putting the Spotlight on Coriander Seed Oil

Migraines? Powdered Ginger May Help

Are Americans Really Getting Too Much Vitamin D? A Critical Look at Recent Media Warnings

Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause

Is Activated Charcoal Beneficial?

German Chamomile Oil: A Versatile Essential Oil You Should Have at Home

 
Print Page
Email Article

Book Examines Connections Between Food, Culture and Psychology

  [ 76 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • June 16, 2003


Do you mash your potatoes or roast them? Prefer a martini or a rum and Coke? The answers to these and other questions about what you eat can tell researchers a lot about who you are.

This is just one of the findings by Leon Rappoport, a professor of psychology at Kansas State University. In his recent book, "How We Eat: Appetite, Culture and the Psychology of Food," he addresses the way cultures define things as edible, food habits and ideologies, the origin of eating disorders, the relationship of food to sex and aggression, the future of marketing and the psychological implications behind these issues.

"Every aspect of eating behavior has both a social component and a psychological context," Rappoport said. "The food we eat is defined by our social class and values.

"For example, the lower classes tend to prefer sweet drinks and foods, whereas the upper class prefers dry drinks and food items that tend to be bitter, astringent, or more complex flavors that you have to develop a taste for. It has to do with the self-discipline of food," Rappoport explained.

This concept of self-control is also what links food to sex and aggression.

"Food and sex are both visceral appetites, and there's the idea that these appetites and behaviors need to be socialized and controlled," Rappoport says. "That's why we teach children manners at an early age."

As societies change, the foods that people eat and the body images they associate with status also evolve. Rappoport explains that in the 19th century, the working class typically performed physical labor, so the function of food was to fuel the body. Thus, a body we would now consider overweight was considered desirable because it was associated with prosperity, success and the sedentary lifestyle of the upper class.

"Today, however, it's the opposite," Rappoport says. "In modern society, food has taken on an aesthetic value, so the ability to eat delicately and remain as thin as possible is associated with status because those people don't need food for fuel."

However, the conflict between rationality and emotion that creates opposing forces in the dieting and food-advertising industries creates a similar psychological contrast in individuals, which brings other factors into an individual's food choices.

"We've found that people make decisions about what they eat for one of three reasons: health, pleasure, or spirituality. However, people trade off these three ideologies and are very inconsistent. It's common for people to choose healthy foods for breakfast, convenient foods for lunch, and then indulge in a luxurious meal in the evening," Rappoport explained.

"People are very inconsistent, and it drives marketers crazy. The holy grail of food marketing is to come up with something that satisfies two of the three ideologies."

Rappoport spent 10 years researching eating habits and decision-making behavior from historical, anthropological, cultural, biological and psychological perspectives before writing this book.

"I've found that people typically aren't aware of the degree of cognitive and emotional aspects related to food," Rappoport said. "This is psychologically significant because it suggests that from childhood and adolescence onwards, critical self-awareness about our food habits provides an essential foundation for the development of a deeply personal, intrinsic sense of creative autonomy."



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Optimized Curcumin Longvida®

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium

Natural Remedies

Fatigue & Fibro Fog: Could You Have a B-12 Deficiency? Fatigue & Fibro Fog: Could You Have a B-12 Deficiency?
Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function
Cell-Charging Compound Gives Steady Energy to Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Patients Cell-Charging Compound Gives Steady Energy to Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Patients
SAD? Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder SAD? Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder
The Big Blue Fish that Helps Chase the Blues Away The Big Blue Fish that Helps Chase the Blues Away

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map