ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Curcumin: The All In One Solution, Part 2

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin K2?

Vitamin D deficiency + high fat diet = metabolic syndrome

Why You Should Take Your Apple Cider Vinegar at Night

Use Burdock Oil to Promote Healthy Hair Growth

AMA journal associates iron deficiency with hearing loss

Meet Your Weight Loss Goals

People with forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease may benefit from boosting niacin in diet, resea...

Lutein linked to preservation of crystallized intelligence

Zinc eaten at levels found in biofortified crops reduces 'wear and tear' on DNA

 
Print Page
Email Article

New Brain Scan Points to Future Memory Impairment

  [ 44 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • September 17, 2001




In a new three-year study, researchers at the New York University School of Medicine may be able to predict which healthy elderly men and women would develop memory impairment based on scans of their brains. The brain scan, along with other tests, may one day provide physicians with the tools to identify those individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

The study, led by Dr. Mony J. de Leon, Director of the Center for Brain Health and Professor of Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine, shows that metabolic changes occur in particular regions of the brain years before there are any clinical signs of memory loss. The study demonstrated these changes with PET (positron imaging tomography), a brain scan that employs radioactively labeled glucose to show the brain at work. The study is published in the September 11 issue of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Our work extends the use of PET scanning to identifying in normal aging subjects the earliest metabolic abnormalities that may lead to the memory losses referred to as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The diagnosis of MCI carries a high risk for future Alzheimer's disease," says Dr. de Leon. "The results will allow us to distinguish individuals at increased risk of memory impairment, but it is still too early to apply the brain scans outside of a research setting. We need to confirm our results with a larger group of subjects and to identify the biological and physiological factors leading to the metabolism losses. If we can identify these factors, then we may be able to find a way to delay the onset of Alzheimer's or prevent it altogether."

The new study followed a group of 48 healthy men and women between the ages of 60 and 80. At the beginning of the study, everyone scored within the normal range on a battery of tests typically used to detect early loss of memory and other mental skills. However, PET scans revealed a reduction in glucose metabolism in an area of the brain called the entorhinal cortex among 12 people. Three years later, 11 of these people had experienced MCI and one developed Alzheimer's disease. The individuals with normal PET scans did not show any signs of mental decline at the three-year follow-up.

Moreover, among the group whose mental acuity declined, carriers of the apolipoprotein E4 gene, a biomarker linked to Alzheimer's, showed large reductions in brain metabolic activity over the course of the study. Such metabolic changes may account for the increased risk for Alzheimer's associated with the gene, says Dr. de Leon.

Along with Antonio Convit, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine, and Susan DeSanti, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine, Dr. de Leon has been characterizing the changes in brain architecture and metabolism that may point to future losses in memory and intellectual ability. They are also studying biomarkers, such as forms of a protein called tau, which accumulate in the cerebrospinal fluid. They hope that the brain scans and biomarkers will one day provide a sensitive test to identify people at risk for Alzheimer's.

"We want to learn how the brain becomes vulnerable to this disease," says Dr. de Leon.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function

Natural Remedies

Dreaming of a Good Night's Sleep? Dreaming of a Good Night's Sleep?
More Weight Loss than Any Other Discovery in Supplement History More Weight Loss than Any Other Discovery in Supplement History
Aches and Pains? A Simple Solution You'll Love Aches and Pains? A Simple Solution You'll Love
How to Jump-start and Sustain Energy Production in CFS How to Jump-start and Sustain Energy Production in CFS
Secret Nutrient for Radiant Skin Secret Nutrient for Radiant Skin

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map