ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Curcumin: The All In One Solution, Part 2

CoQ10 — A Nutritional Powerhouse for Mitochondrial Health

How to Prevent Hearing Loss and Improve Your Hearing With Nutrition

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin K2?

Vitamin D deficiency + high fat diet = metabolic syndrome

Use Burdock Oil to Promote Healthy Hair Growth

Why You Should Take Your Apple Cider Vinegar at Night

AMA journal associates iron deficiency with hearing loss

Lutein linked to preservation of crystallized intelligence

Zinc eaten at levels found in biofortified crops reduces 'wear and tear' on DNA

 
Print Page
Email Article

New Memory Tests Helps Predict Dementia

  [ 87 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • January 27, 2003


If they have to remember words, elderly persons in an early stage of dementia do not benefit from the relationship in meaning between these words. This was revealed in doctoral research by the neuropsychologist Pauline Spaan from the University of Amsterdam. As a result, the researchers believe it is now possible to develop memory tests that can predict dementia.

Spaan's research reveals that elderly persons who were found to have dementia two years later, were scarcely better at remembering word pairs clearly linked in meaning (for example, pipe - cigar) than word pairs without such a link (for example nail - butter). However, elderly persons who did not have dementia two years later normally benefited from such a link in meaning when remembering word pairs. Spaan concluded that the memory problems of elderly people in an early stage of dementia could be attributed to a disrupted semantic processing.

In addition it transpired that a test for the unconscious (implicit) recall of previously presented words significantly improved the prediction of dementia: elderly persons in the early stage of dementia did not benefit from the repeated presentation of words.

With these data it is possible to distinguish 'normal' age-related memory problems that generally occur in the elderly from memory problems typical of the early stages of dementia. This is particularly important, as the present generation of drugs aimed at inhibiting the course of dementia are only useful if administered in the earliest stages of the disease.

A large group of elderly people who lived (semi-) independently, were subjected by Spaan to a wide range of memory tests developed at the University of Amsterdam. These elderly persons participated in the population study Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam from the Free University of Amsterdam. The tests were conducted on two occasions with an interval of two years.

Using the official diagnostic criteria, nobody in the group was found to have dementia during the first assessment. During the repeat assessment two years later, it was established who had developed dementia during the intervening period. Using data from the first assessment, Spaan compared the memory test performance of the elderly persons who later developed dementia with those who did not.

Spaan argues that the current methods used to detect dementia concentrate too much on the so-called episodic memory. That is the conscious memory of personal and specific information related to time and place. The researcher recommends the use of memory tests that in addition to the episodic memory also assume a semantic memory (concerning general knowledge and information, including our vocabulary) and an implicit memory (which includes various unconscious learning processes). In this manner the current test material could be improved in order to recognize dementia at an earlier stage.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Energy NADH™ 12.5mg

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%

Natural Remedies

Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS
When a Good Night's Sleep Is Just a Daydream... When a Good Night's Sleep Is Just a Daydream...
Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker
The New Dual Activation Pain Relief Cream The New Dual Activation Pain Relief Cream
Running on Empty? Fuel Up with NADH Running on Empty? Fuel Up with NADH

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map