ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Curcumin: The All In One Solution, Part 2

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin K2?

Vitamin D deficiency + high fat diet = metabolic syndrome

Why You Should Take Your Apple Cider Vinegar at Night

Use Burdock Oil to Promote Healthy Hair Growth

AMA journal associates iron deficiency with hearing loss

Meet Your Weight Loss Goals

People with forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease may benefit from boosting niacin in diet, resea...

Lutein linked to preservation of crystallized intelligence

Zinc eaten at levels found in biofortified crops reduces 'wear and tear' on DNA

 
Print Page
Email Article

Two Proteins May Help Prevent Alzheimer's Brain Plaques

  [ 46 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • January 22, 2004


St. Louis, Jan. 21, 2004 -- A study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests two proteins work together in mice to prevent formation of brain plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.

The proteins, apolipoprotein E (apoE) and clusterin, appear to act as "chaperones" orchestrating the clearance of potentially hazardous molecules out of the brain. Ironically, these proteins also have been implicated in a key stage of plaque formation. The study appears in the Jan. 22 issue of the journal Neuron.

"This is one of the first demonstrations in living animals that these proteins affect amyloid clearance," says David H. Holtzman, M.D., the Andrew B. and Gretchen P. Jones Professor and head of the Department of Neurology. "Our findings suggest it is worthwhile to explore the use of drugs or therapies to alter or perhaps increase the expression of these proteins as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease."

Holtzman, who also is the Charlotte and Paul Hagemann Professor of Neurology and professor of molecular biology and pharmacology, led the study; Ronald DeMattos, Ph.D., formerly an instructor in neurology, and John R. Cirrito, a graduate student in neuroscience, are co-first authors. The team collaborated with Eli Lilly and Company, where DeMattos now works.

A key step in the development of Alzheimer's disease is the formation of brain plaques. Studies suggest these plaques form when the protein amyloid beta (Abeta) is converted from its soluble to its insoluble form and coalesces into hair-shaped threads called fibrils. Unable to dissolve or be cleared out of the brain, the fibrils eventually clump together and become the amyloid plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's.

In previous studies, Holtzman's team was instrumental in showing both apoE and clusterin promote the formation of these fibrils. Their new paper confirms that in mice genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's disease-like brain plaques, those without either apoE or clusterin developed fewer fibrils.

The team therefore expected mice lacking both proteins would develop even fewer deposits. However, the opposite was true. Moreover, fibrils in animals lacking both proteins developed significantly earlier in life and resulted in the more advanced amyloid plaques. Such extreme Abeta deposition at a young age is akin to that in humans with the rare, genetic form of the disease called familial Alzheimer's.

"This was an unexpected and striking result," Holtzman says. "Though at first counter-intuitive, it implies that apoE and clusterin cooperate to suppress Abeta deposition."

In addition to increased amounts of Abeta in brain tissue, the team also found abnormally high levels in the fluid surrounding individual brain cells and in the fluid surrounding the entire brain. In contrast, levels of Abeta in the blood were not abnormally high.

Combined, the results suggest the two proteins not only play a role in the development of fibrils, but also in the clearance of Abeta from brain tissue and surrounding fluid. Without its chaperones, Abeta protein settles in the brain and eventually clusters into plaques.

According to Holtzman, the next step is to determine whether human forms of apoE and clusterin also delay or prevent the development of plaques in the mouse model and to explore the potential for drugs or gene therapy to reverse plaque formation in mice.

DeMattos RB, Cirrito JR, Parsadanian M, May PC, O'Dell MA, Tayler JW, Harmony JAK, Aronow BJ, Bales KR, Paul SM, Holtzman DM. ApoE and clusterin cooperatively suppress Abeta levels and deposition: Evidence at apoE regulates extracellular Abeta metabolism in vivo. Neuron, Jan. 22, 2004.

Funding from the National Institutes of Health, MetLife Foundation and Eli Lilly and Company supported this research.

The full-time and volunteer faculty of Washington University School of Medicine are the physicians and surgeons of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals. The School of Medicine is one of the leading medical research, teaching and patient-care institutions in the nation. Through its affiliations with Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to BJC HealthCare.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
FibroSleep™ Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Ultra ATP+, Double Strength

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium

Natural Remedies

The Revolutionary 'Good Fat' That Promotes Heart, Brain, Bone and Joint Health The Revolutionary 'Good Fat' That Promotes Heart, Brain, Bone and Joint Health
Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker Coenzyme Q10 - The Energy Maker
Research Links Green Tea to Weight Loss Research Links Green Tea to Weight Loss
Front Line Defense Against Colds & Flu - Support for Healthy Immune System Balance Front Line Defense Against Colds & Flu - Support for Healthy Immune System Balance
Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map