ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

10 Fibro-Friendly Foods with a Bonus: Beautiful Skin

Fight Back! Win the War Being Waged Against Your Immune System

Studies Show that Magnesium L-threonate Improves Brain Plasticity, Leading to Direct and Significant...

Clary Sage Oil May Be Pricey, but Its Benefits Are Priceless

Component of red wine, grapes can help to reduce inflammation, study finds

Poly MVA: A Novel Therapy for Increasing Energy, Repairing DNA, and Promoting Overall Health

Pumpkin Pie Turmeric Breakfast Smoothie - Vegan + Gluten-Free

Vitamin D supplementation extends life in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Conquer Your Email Inbox, Increase Productivity and Reduce Stress

Print Page
Email Article

Research news from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University

  [ 270 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ] • October 14, 2004

Source: Tufts University Focus on osteoporosis NOTE: The US Surgeon General's Report on Bone Health and Osteoporosis was released on October 14th. Osteoporosis is a critical health issue in this country, particularly for elders. Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, president of the board of trustees for the National Osteoporosis Foundation and a nationally renowned expert on osteoporosis, notes in a recent journal article (summarized below) that it is "the most common metabolic bone disease in the United States, reaching epidemic proportions in the elderly population."* The National Osteoporosis Foundation reports that "One in every two women and one in every four men age 50 and older will experience an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime." This issue of Nutrition Notes focuses on two recent studies from Tufts University on osteoporosis. --Gap in Care Found for Fracture Patients-- In a recent one-year study following the care of patients over the age of 51 who had been seen at a hospital for an acute fracture, researchers at Tufts and other institutions found that few of these patients were treated for osteoporosis. The authors note that the risk of re-fracture could be reduced drastically if more patients were evaluated and treated for osteoporosis. In the study, six months after the fracture, of the 86 patients who could be reached, only 36% of the women and 7% of the men had recently discussed osteoporosis with their primary care physician, and there was no increase in the use of osteoporosis medications by the patients. Among the men and women who were advised by their doctors to increase intake of vitamin D and calcium, there was a significant increase in the use of vitamin D and calcium supplements, and an increase in the consumption of dairy foods. But, importantly, the men and women who did not receive this advice showed no significant changes in their intake of these substances. At twelve months, the treatment profiles were unchanged. "Our study shows that when doctors do recommend increasing vitamin D and calcium, that patients comply," said corresponding author Bess Dawson-Hughes, MD, director of the Bone Metabolism Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts. "Primary care physicians are in a position to help patients reduce their risk of re-fracture by taking prescription osteoporosis medication and by increasing vitamin D and calcium in their diets. These patients just need a bit of counsel." "In conclusion, the occurrence of a fracture did not prompt additional prescription bone medication use in either the women or the men in this study. Men were not advised to increase their calcium intakes after their fractures and did not do so. Calcium supplement use and dairy food intake did increase after the fractures in the women, and these increases occurred specifically in those women who were advised by their physicians to consume more calcium. The responsiveness of our patients to the advice of their physicians suggests that the primary care physician is well positioned to bring about much needed change in the care of fracture patients," reported Bess Dawson-Hughes and co-authors in the conclusion of the study. For "Fast Facts" about the prevalence of osteoporosis, please visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation web site at: *Pro-Risquez, A., Harris, S., Song, L., Rudicel, S., Barnewolt, B., Dawson-Hughes, B. Osteoporosis International, 2004, 15: 689-694. "Calcium supplement and osteoporosis medication use in women and men with recent fractures." --A Pick-Up Game Now May Mean Healthier Bones Later-- There might be more to sports in college than building team spirit and camaraderie. According to a study of college-aged students (ages 17-21), young Caucasian adults may require more moderate to vigorous physical activity, such as sports, than is currently recommended for overall health and to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis. The data are from the Tufts Longitudinal Health Study, an ongoing study that is researching the relationships between health knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and physiologic outcomes of college-age students over time. Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low-bone density, can lead to debilitating injuries, but often progresses undetected for years before symptoms appear. Weight-bearing exercise, particularly in the first three decades of life, is key to preventing it. Yet, one national survey reported that only 38% of college students in the US engage in vigorous activity and 20% engage in moderate physical activity. "We know that life transitions, like entering college, represent an opportunity to influence physical activity," said Christina Economos, PhD, assistant professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts. "And we know that weight-bearing physical activity is critical to preventing osteoporosis. We found that sports participation and weight training are associated with a stronger bone stiffness for both men and women. Bone stiffness is related to bone strength and higher bone stiffness is associated with lower risk for osteoporosis." Economos and a colleague examined the relationship between skeletal status and physical activity in a group of 235 college students between the ages of 17 and 21. The study examined how participation in different physical activities affected bone health in men and women. Both moderate and vigorous sports participation, as well as weightlifting, were associated with higher bone stiffness in both men and women. Muscle mass and strength affected bone quality differently in men and women, but taking part in physical activity improved bone stiffness in both groups. The vigorous sports, such as soccer, basketball, ultimate Frisbee, baseball, cheerleading and rugby were clearly weight-bearing and high-impact activities which are known to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. However, participation in moderate sports, such as leisure volleyball, golf, and doubles tennis, was also found to be associated with increased bone quality, but this effect among women was much lower than the effect of vigorous sports. Economos, who is also associate director of the John Hancock Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition at Tufts, noted, "Our study showed that young people should be encouraged to participate more in sports of all kinds -- whether they play on a varsity team or just get into the habit of participating in intramural or pick up games -- the difference may be health benefits for years to come." Wetter, A., Economos, C., Osteoporosis International, 2004, 15: 799-806. "Relationship between quantitative ultrasound, anthropometry and sports participation in college aged adults." If you are interested in hearing more about any of the studies or speaking with a member of the faculty of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy or another Tufts health sciences researcher, please contact Siobhan Gallagher via email at or by calling 617-636-6586. The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight centers, which focus on questions relating to famine, hunger, poverty, and communications, are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy. For two decades, the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University has studied the relationship between good nutrition and good health in aging populations. Tufts research scientists work with federal agencies to establish the USDA Dietary Guidelines, the Dietary Reference Intakes, and other significant public policies.

Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products

Article Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment

Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium

Natural Remedies

D-ficient? Health Risks You Need to Know About D-ficient? Health Risks You Need to Know About
Green Coffee Extract: Unique Obesity Intervention Green Coffee Extract: Unique Obesity Intervention
When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear
Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World
Pioneer Scientists Uncover a Revolutionary Neuroprotective Supplement for Nerve Health Pioneer Scientists Uncover a Revolutionary Neuroprotective Supplement for Nerve Health

ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
Credit Card Processing
Be the first to know about new products, special discounts and the latest health news. *New subscribers only

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map