ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Is Magnesium the Missing Link in Your Heart Healthy Routine?

A Little Zinc Goes a Long Way

Supplementation with vitamin D associated with improved testosterone, erectile function among middle...

More evidence for calorie restriction’s longevity effect

Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of chronic headache

Wearable biosensors can flag illness, Lyme disease, risk for diabetes; low airplane oxygen

VIDEO: The Best Brain Foods That Help Increase Your Memory!

Iron (And More) For Lasting, Natural Energy

Get the Most From Your Green Tea

Affordable Care Act made cancer screening more accessible for millions, study finds

 
Print Page
Email Article

Study Suggests Antibiotic May Limit or Prevent Vision Problems Caused by Diabetes

  [ 62 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • May 10, 2005


Source: Penn State HERSHEY, PA–

A Penn State College of Medicine study suggests that a common antibiotic called minocycline may slow or prevent diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that is the leading cause of blindness in people ages 20 to 74. The team found that minocycline, often used to treat acne, limits by about 50 percent the retinal damage caused by microglia. Microglia are cells that act as the "cleanup crew" for the Central Nervous System (CNS). They destroy damaged cells by releasing toxins and they engulf them, much like a PacmanTM. Should they become activated and release their toxins in the retina, those toxins will kill the healthy neurons critical for normal vision.

"Our studies in rats suggest that this antibiotic may be a strong candidate for further consideration as a therapeutic drug in reducing the retinal complications of diabetes," said Kyle Krady, Ph.D., assistant professor of neural and behavioral sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. "Further studies are necessary to test the prediction that minocycline will reduce damage to the retina."

The study titled "Minocycline Reduces Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression, Microglial Activation, and Caspase-3 Activation in a Rodent Model of Diabetic Retinopathy" was published in the May edition of Diabetes, a journal of the American Diabetes Association. Previous studies have shown that the changes diabetes causes in the body lead to increased production of cytokines, proteins that cause inflammation of the nerves. This study goes a step further to show that in early diabetes elevated levels of cytokines activate microglia, which produce neurotoxins and kill nerve cells. The neuron death causes the progressive vision loss characteristic of diabetic retinopathy and results in 12,000 to 24,000 new cases of blindness each year in the U.S.

After establishing that microglia are activated early in the course of diabetes, the team compared the mRNA levels of cytokines in the retinas of rats with diabetes to healthy rats. Increasing mRNA levels are an indicator of increasing cytokine production. The team found that there was a four- to six-fold increase in cytokines present in the retinas of diabetic rats. Because cytokines activate microglia, the investigators asked whether the microglia in the retinas of diabetic rats were activated, and established that, indeed, they were. Then, the team treated diabetic rats with minocycline and the mRNA levels of cytokines were subsequently measured. "Minocycline reduces the neuroinflammation in the retina caused by cytokines, which reduces microglia activation, and hence, reduces their production of neurotoxins with the net result being that there is less retinal nerve death," said Steve Levison, Ph.D., professor of neural and behavioral sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, and professor of neurology and neuroscience, University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey.

"These results confirm studies that showed that diabetes causes an early increase in the expression of inflammatory mediators within the retina, and it shows that minocycline reduces this inflammatory component." To determine whether the toxins from activated microglia kill the retinal cells, the team grew active microglia with retinal cells. Some cultures were treated with minocycline while others were not. Activated microglia caused a 2.5-fold increase in retinal cell death. By contrast, in co-cultures treated with minocycline, nearly all retinal cells survived. An additional study in rats confirmed the results. "This study has shed more light on the processes that lead to vision loss in those with diabetes," Levison said. "We hope that these discoveries will lead to new treatments for diabetic retinopathy, which remains a leading cause of blindness."

In addition to Krady and Levison, the study team included: Anirban Basu and Colleen M. Allen, Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences; Yuping Xu, Kathryn LaNoue, and Thomas W. Gardner, Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. All research methods followed the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology statement on the Use of Animals in Ophthalmology and Vision Research and were approve by the Animal Care and Use Committee of Penn State College of Medicine. This study was supported by a program project grant from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Optimized Curcumin Longvida®

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%

Natural Remedies

Stop Bacteria With Nature's Antibiotics Stop Bacteria With Nature's Antibiotics
Eating Fat is Good... Maybe... Could Be... Sometimes Eating Fat is Good... Maybe... Could Be... Sometimes
Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unlocking the Secrets of Peppermint, Acacia and Fennel Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unlocking the Secrets of Peppermint, Acacia and Fennel
Quercetin: Natural Support for Allergy & Inflammation Relief and More Quercetin: Natural Support for Allergy & Inflammation Relief and More
Undenatured Type II Collagen - Chicken Soup for Your Joints Undenatured Type II Collagen - Chicken Soup for Your Joints

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map