ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

10 Fibro-Friendly Foods with a Bonus: Beautiful Skin

Studies Show that Magnesium L-threonate Improves Brain Plasticity, Leading to Direct and Significant...

Clary Sage Oil May Be Pricey, but Its Benefits Are Priceless

Pumpkin Pie Turmeric Breakfast Smoothie - Vegan + Gluten-Free

Component of red wine, grapes can help to reduce inflammation, study finds

Poly MVA: A Novel Therapy for Increasing Energy, Repairing DNA, and Promoting Overall Health

Vitamin D supplementation extends life in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Conquer Your Email Inbox, Increase Productivity and Reduce Stress

The Significance of Selenium

Print Page
Email Article

Moderate Aggression May Lead to Stronger Immune Systems

  [ 725 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ] • August 28, 2000

Many CFS and FM sufferers are aware that a healthy immune system is key to their health. However, what many sufferers may not be aware of is that aggression may lead to a stronger immune system – especially in men.

"We have observed this relationship in animal studies but this is the first time that a connection has been made between aggression and immunity in humans," says Douglas Granger, associate professor of biobehavioral health in Penn State's College of Health and Human Development.

Granger and colleagues believe that men who have been in occasional fights or in trouble with the law have immune systems that may be ready to launch a more rapid and intense response to pathogens than do the immune systems in men who are seldom aggressive.

"Our study suggests that differences in people's aggressive behavior influences how their immune systems are prepared to deal with infections, viruses and bacteria," says Alan Booth, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State.

The researchers studied a sample of 4,415 men, aged 30 to 48 years, who were interviewed to determine their level of aggressive behavior. Subjects then underwent a medical examination to determine their state of health. The researchers also took blood samples from each subject. Those samples were then analyzed for different types of white blood cells or lymphocytes.

"White blood cells are major players in the body's immune system," explains Granger. Out of eight enumerative indicators of immune activity studied, two specialized types of lymphocytes (CD4 cells and B cells) that determine the initiation, magnitude, and duration of specific cellular immune responses were present in high concentrations in the circulation of moderately aggressive men.

Granger believes that the activity of these particular lymphocytes, which includes antibody production and secretion of intercellular signals that turn the immune response on or off, has considerable value for increasing the chances of survival in a pathologically challenging environment.

According to the study, individuals who reported engaging in two aggressive acts were 30 percent more likely to be in the top quartile of CD4 cell numbers than those reporting no aggressive acts. However, increases in aggressive behavior did not convey correspondingly higher odds of being in the top quartile.

Men reported on 12 different acts of aggression ranging all the way from playing hooky twice a year or more to fights involving weapons.

"The strength of the finding is that we controlled for all types of factors that could impact the subjects' immune systems, such as whether the subjects smoked or consumed alcohol, their level of health and their testosterone scores," says Booth. "While testosterone was associated with aggressive behavior, it was not the hormone that accounted for the higher immune cells found among aggressive men."

The study was a joint effort between researchers at Penn State and the University of Nebraska and appears in the current issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, the professional journal for the American Psychosomatic Society.

Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Ultra ATP+, Double Strength

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products

Article Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment

Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils

Natural Remedies

"It's Not Easy Being Green" - But It Is Healthy
D-ficient? Health Risks You Need to Know About D-ficient? Health Risks You Need to Know About
Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS
SAD? Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder SAD? Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder
Eating Fat is Good... Maybe... Could Be... Sometimes Eating Fat is Good... Maybe... Could Be... Sometimes

ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
Credit Card Processing
Be the first to know about new products, special discounts and the latest health news. *New subscribers only

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map