ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Inflammation Disrupts Memory - What Can You Do to Protect Your Brain?

Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issues

All About Ginkgo Biloba: Benefits of This Timeless Herbal Supplement

Yarrow Oil: Here's Why It Deserves a Place in Your First-Aid Kit

Vitamin D supplement use associated with lower risk of breast cancer

Carnitine deficiency suggested as contributor to autism

Lutein — An Important Nutrient for Eye and Brain Health

Hop Oil: A Safe Sleep Aide

White Camphor Oil: The Purest Camphor Oil

Taurine: Facts About This Crucial Amino Acid

 
Print Page
Email Article

Scripps study highlights promise of gabapentin [NeurontinR] as potential therapy for alcoholism – has controlled clinical trials under way

  [ 284 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By Scripps Research Institute • www.ProHealth.com • May 30, 2008


In new research published in The Journal of Neuroscience - "Cellular and Behavioral Interactions of Gabapentin with Alcohol Dependence" - Scripps scientists found that gabapentin normalizes the action of certain brain cells altered by chronic alcohol abuse in an area of the brain known as the central amygdala, which plays an important role in fear- and stress-related behaviors, as well as in regulating alcohol drinking. In the study, alcohol-dependent rodents receiving gabapentin drank less alcohol.

“The results are exciting,” said Scripps Research Assistant Professor Marisa Roberto, PhD, who was first author of the study. “Our research shows that gabapentin not only changes the alcohol-consumption patterns of addicted rats (and not of the control group), but also may reverse some of the effects of addiction on a specific neurotransmitter in the brain.”

"This is an example of the strength of the translational approach of the Pearson Center, where the clinical uses of gabapentin led us to hypothesize that gabapentin may act to restore homeostatic dysregulation of the GABAergic system," said George Koob, PhD, chair of the Scripps Research Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders and co-director of the Pearson Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research at Scripps Research.

"Cellular and behavioral studies converged to suggest that indeed gabapentin could normalize GABAergic tone in a specific brain region known to be dysregulated in dependent animals. Such results provide a strong rationale for translating these observations back to the clinical setting for the treatment of alcoholism."

In previous studies, gabapentin has been shown to effectively treat alcohol withdrawal and reduce alcohol consumption and cravings following detoxification in alcoholics.

However, how gabapentin could act to combat alcohol dependence in the brain has been unclear. The new study sheds light on this question by detailing the action of gabapentin (known commercially as NeurontinR) - a structural analogue of the inhibitory synaptic transmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) - on neural signaling in the brain. [Structurally similar to the neurotransmitter GABA.]

In the new study, the scientists first tested the effects of gabapentin on the behavior of alcohol-dependent and non-dependent rats.

  • The researchers found that alcohol-dependent rats that received gabapentin drank significantly less alcohol and demonstrated fewer anxiety-like behaviors in the face of alcohol abstinence than those who did not receive the drug.
  • The behavior of non-dependent rats receiving gabapentin remained unaffected.
  • These results were observed both when the rats received gabapentin systemically and when the medication was infused directly into the central amygdala region of the brain.

At the cellular level, dependence on alcohol has been associated with increased strength of inhibitory synapses (junctions between two nerve cells) in the central amygdala. In the new study, the scientists found gabapentin, like alcohol:

  • Increased the strength of these central amygdala inhibitory synapse cells from non-dependent rats,
  • But decreased their strength in cells from alcohol-dependent rats.

Interestingly, these effects of gabapentin disappeared in the presence of a specific inhibitor of so-called GABAB receptors, indicating that gabapentin’s cellular mechanisms likely involve changes in release of the transmitter GABA at the inhibitory synapses.

Suggesting a biological mechanism for development of alcohol dependence...

The scientists also found that the sensitivity of GABAB receptors decreased with alcohol dependence, suggesting a biological mechanism for the development of alcohol dependence in general and for gabapentin’s contrasting effects before and after long-term alcohol exposure in particular.

The scientists plan to further explore the mechanism of action of gabapentin in the brain.

Clinical trials under way

In addition, clinical trials on the effectiveness of gabapentin as a treatment for alcohol dependence are currently under way at The Scripps Research Institute. [Visit ClinicalTrials.gov to read about the trial, titled “Gabapentin Treatment of Alcohol Dependence.”]

The work was supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health, the Harold L. Dorris Neurological Research Institute at Scripps Research, and The Scripps Research Institute.

___
Note: This information has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is generic and is not meant to prevent, diagnose, treat or cure any illness, condition, or disease. It is very important that you make no change in your healthcare plan or health support regimen without reviewing and discussing it in collaboration with your professional healthcare team.




Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
FibroSleep™ Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Energy NADH™ 12.5mg


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils

Natural Remedies

Block food Cravings At Their Molecular Root Block food Cravings At Their Molecular Root
Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World
Vitamin K-2 – A Key Player in Cardiovascular and Bone Health Vitamin K-2 – A Key Player in Cardiovascular and Bone Health
Reversing Neurodegeneration with a New Magnesium Compound Reversing Neurodegeneration with a New Magnesium Compound
Undenatured Type II Collagen - Chicken Soup for Your Joints Undenatured Type II Collagen - Chicken Soup for Your Joints

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map