ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

SURVEY: Cognitive Impairment II

Top 3 Nutrients to Detox the Liver and Soothe Digestion

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

Potential of Quercetin in the Treatment of Melanoma

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

Supplementation with vitamins C and E associated with decreased risk of cognitive impairment, dement...

 
Print Page
Email Article

Hidden Toxin Gene in Chlamydia Linked to Chronic Illnesses

  [ 18 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases • www.ProHealth.com • November 19, 2001




NIH NEWS RELEASE

After more than 50 years of searching, scientists have discovered a key gene that enables certain bacteria to cause blindness and debilitating genital tract infections.

Using the recently completed genetic blueprint of the bacterium "Chlamydia trachomatis", researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) have found a gene that encodes a cell-destroying toxin. Long suspected but never identified, the toxin helps explain why only some chlamydial strains cause chronic illness.

The discovery, described in the "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" November 13, 2001 online early edition, opens potential new avenues for treating or preventing chlamydial diseases. It also highlights how DNA sequencing can help scientists identify new ways to combat disabling or deadly infections.

Unlike most bacteria, "C. trachomatis" lives inside cells. Chronic infections of the eyelids can scar the eyes and lead to trachoma, the most common cause of preventable blindness worldwide. In the United States, "C. trachomatis" infection is the most common sexually
transmitted disease (STD) and can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, tubal pregnancies and infertility in women. All of these diseases are caused by chronic inflammation at the site of infection, but not all "C. trachomatis" strains produce this effect. Since the late 1940s, researchers have believed a toxin might cause the inflammation, but no such toxin had ever been found.

"These bacteria cause debilitating illnesses in hundreds of millions of people throughout the world," says Harlan Caldwell, Ph.D., a leading chlamydia researcher at NIAID's Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, MT. "If we could find a toxin that helps the bacteria attack and destroy cells, we would have a major new target for diagnostic tests, vaccines and drugs."

Dr. Caldwell joined Robert Belland, Ph.D., and their colleagues to look for the toxin using a new tool: the genetic blueprint of "C. trachomatis". The researchers compared the genomes of two "C. trachomatis" strains: one that is restricted to mucosal surfaces and infects the eyes and genital tract, and one that is invasive and infects cells in the lymph nodes. The genes of the two strains were almost identical except for a single region of the bacterial chromosome. When the investigators studied that region in more detail, they found a stretch of DNA that resembled a known gene for the so-called toxin B of "Clostridium difficile". That bacterium causes a
potentially fatal infection of the large intestine in humans and is closely related to the deadly microbes that cause tetanus, botulism and gangrene. Toxin B makes the protein scaffolding inside of cells collapse, causing the cells that line mucosal passageways to separate from one another.

The "C. difficile" bacteria can then use the spaces between the cells to invade deeper into the intestinal wall.

To see if the candidate gene found in "C. trachomatis" actually encoded a protein similar to clostridial toxin B, Drs. Caldwell and Belland looked for evidence of the toxin in the bacteria. Their studies showed that "C. trachomatis" produces specific changes in infected cells,
and those changes are indistinguishable from ones induced by the clostridial toxin. Infected cells also contained toxin-encoding RNA, a type of DNA photocopy that shuttles its genetic instructions to the cell's protein-making machinery. The researchers also showed that infected cells contain a protein resembling toxin B, suggesting the cells deciphered the RNA's instructions.

"Finding the toxin would have been nearly impossible without the genome information," says Dr. Belland. Without it, he explains, the search would have resembled the proverbial needle in a haystack. The genome gave them a good idea of what haystack the needle was in, where it was
located, and what the needle might look like.

Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of NIAID, agrees that genome sequencing offers great promise in improving global health. "Determining the DNA sequence of the world's leading infectious microbes is a high priority within NIAID," he states. "This study is one example of how that commitment can provide researchers with a powerful tool for understanding and eventually treating or preventing
infectious diseases."

The discovery of a specific toxin associated with trachoma and STD-causing "C. trachomatis" strains is a boon to investigators trying to understand these diseases. Drs. Caldwell and Belland plan to continue their studies to determine how the toxin helps the bacteria cause disease and how it interacts with a person's immune system.

Further investigations should reveal new ways to attack the bacteria, perhaps by using an antitoxin vaccine, as is done with tetanus and diphtheria, or by developing drugs that block the toxin's ability to destroy cells.

NIAID is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIAID supports basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose, and treat infectious and immune-mediated illnesses, including HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, malaria, autoimmune disorders, asthma and allergies.

REFERENCE:
RJ Belland, et al. "Chlamydia trachomatis" cytotoxicity
associated with complete and partial toxin genes.
"Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" Early
Edition online (Nov. 13, 2001).



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
FibroSleep™ Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra ATP+, Double Strength


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid

Natural Remedies

Thyroid Health and Fibromyalgia Thyroid Health and Fibromyalgia
Carry a Massage Therapist in Your Pocket Carry a Massage Therapist in Your Pocket
The Brain Boosting and Fatigue Fighting B-12 The Brain Boosting and Fatigue Fighting B-12
Cocoa's Polyphenol Riches - All the Health Benefits without the Sugar, Calories or Guilt Cocoa's Polyphenol Riches - All the Health Benefits without the Sugar, Calories or Guilt
Optimize Your Immune System Naturally: Thymic Protein A Optimize Your Immune System Naturally: Thymic Protein A

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map