ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Is Coconut Oil Healthy? (The American Heart Association Doesn’t Think So)

American Heart Association Renders Itself Obsolete With 1960s Dietary Advice on Coconut Oil

Ginger Fights Obesity

Health Benefits of Artichokes

Putting the Spotlight on Coriander Seed Oil

Migraines? Powdered Ginger May Help

Are Americans Really Getting Too Much Vitamin D? A Critical Look at Recent Media Warnings

Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause

Vitamin C and antibiotics: A new one-two 'punch' for knocking-out cancer stem cells

German Chamomile Oil: A Versatile Essential Oil You Should Have at Home

 
Print Page
Email Article

Non-Traditional Tests May Be Dynamic Duo in Predicting Heart Problems

  [ 42 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • September 10, 2002


DALLAS, Oct. 1 – Partnering a blood test with an imaging scan may be a better gauge of whether blocked arteries are about to trigger a heart attack or stroke, researchers report in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker for inflammation in the blood stream. Calcium deposits in arteries – measured with computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan – indicate the level of plaque buildup. High CRP levels and calcium scores each have been linked with increased heart disease risk, but routine screenings don't test for them.  "The exact role of both calcium scores and CRP levels await more definitive studies, but we have found that their combined use is predictive of cardiovascular events," says Robert Detrano, M.D., Ph.D. study coauthor and professor of medicine at UCLA School of Medicine.

The tests are complementary: coronary calcium indicates the presence and amount of coronary atherosclerosis, while CRP suggests that plaque contains inflammatory factors that make it more prone to rupture and block blood vessels.

"Together they can gauge the presence, the amount and the stability of artery-clogging plaque," says Detrano.

Recent research has shown elevated CRP levels impart increased risk of a coronary event, he says. However, it's uncertain whether elevated levels of either cause risk or are just an association.

In Detrano's study, researchers examined data from more than 1,400 people free of heart disease when enrolled. Participants were part of the South Bay Health Watch, a study of adults from Los Angeles suburbs. They were 45 years or older with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, but had not exhibited symptoms of cardiovascular disease. All had their calcium and CRP levels measured. Researchers followed 967 of the people who didn't have diabetes for about six and a half years. People with diabetes were excluded because calcium scores have not been shown to predictive.

Fifty people had a heart attack or cardiovascular death and 104 had a cardiovascular event of some kind in the follow up. These people also had higher calcium scores and CRP levels than people who didn't have a cardiovascular event.

Calcium and CRP levels appeared to be synergistic predictors of cardiovascular events. Researchers noted a six-fold difference in risk of heart attack and cardiac death and a seven-fold difference in the risk of any cardiovascular event between the people at lowest risk compared to people at highest risk.

"Individuals at intermediate risk may benefit from profiling based on high sensitivity CRP levels and coronary calcium, as both factors contribute independently toward the incidence of cardiovascular events," says Detrano.

However, he adds that the findings are not strong enough to back widespread screening.

The research didn't address electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), a popular, but scientifically unvalidated way to measure coronary calcium.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Energy NADH™ 12.5mg

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%

Natural Remedies

Looking for Energy? Turn to Plants. Looking for Energy? Turn to Plants.
Improve Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health with Omega-7 Improve Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health with Omega-7
Aches and Pains? A Simple Solution You'll Love Aches and Pains? A Simple Solution You'll Love
Itching to Find Dry Skin Relief? Itching to Find Dry Skin Relief?
Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS Clinically Studied Joint Relief Product for FM & ME/CFS

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map