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Stress Causes Heart Damaging Fats to Stay in Blood Longer

  [ 78 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • April 29, 2002



A new study has found the first evidence showing short periods of psychological stress can cause the body to take longer to remove heart damaging fats from the bloodstream.

In a new study from Ohio State University, researchers compared how quickly triglycerides, a type of fat linked to heart disease, cleared out of the bloodstream in volunteers during a stress-inducing test, to a session in which the volunteers rested.

The results showed that, in all cases, stress caused triglycerides to stay in the bloodstream longer, and suggest one reason why stress has been linked to heart disease.

"If a person has a high-fat snack or meal during a time of stress, that fat is going to be circulating in the blood for a longer period of time," said Catherine Stoney, co-author of the study and professor of psychology at Ohio State University. "That means it may be more likely to be deposited in the arteries where it can contribute to heart disease."

Seventy healthy, nonsmoking middle-aged volunteers - half men and half women -- participated in the study. Half were between the ages of 40 and 48, and half were between 54 and 61. The two age groups allowed the researchers to consider both premenopausal and postmenopausal women during the project. The study appears in the April issue of the journal Psychophysiology.

Each of the volunteers was tested twice, with both sessions occurring within three days of each other. In both sessions, an intravenous tube was inserted into the veins of the volunteers. A solution containing triglycerides - the equivalent of about 100 calories - was then intravenously administered. The procedure replicated what would happen in a person's bloodstream hours after they ate a meal containing fat, Stoney said.

In one session, the volunteers simply rested and their triglyceride level was checked continuously for 40 minutes. In the other session, the volunteers were administered the triglyceride solution and then given 40 minutes of stressful tests.

The tests included having to prepare and give a videotaped speech, a difficult word problem, a psychomotor task consisting of drawing mirror images, and a task where they had to quickly and accurately subtract two digit numbers from four-digit numbers. Again, their triglyceride level was monitoring continuously for 40 minutes.

In all 70 volunteers, triglyceride levels declined more quickly in the restful session than in the session where they completed the stressful tests. Overall, triglyceride levels declined an average of 2.8 percent a minute in the stress-inducing test session, compared to a quicker 3.2 percent per minute in the resting session.

In some people, the difference between the stressful and restful sessions was quite dramatic, Stoney said, while in others the differences in triglyceride levels were small. This reflects individual differences in how people metabolize fat. But it was significant that stress had negative effects in all the volunteers, she said.

The study found that during the non-stress session, women cleared triglycerides out of their bloodstreams more quickly than did men. However, the research found no difference in how quickly men and women cleared triglycerides during stress. Because reproductive hormones might affect how triglycerides are cleared, the researchers separated pre- and naturally postmenopausal women. However, they found no differences in how these groups responded. In an additional analysis, the researchers also compared postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy with those who were not, and again found no differences.



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