ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

10 Fibro-Friendly Foods with a Bonus: Beautiful Skin

Studies Show that Magnesium L-threonate Improves Brain Plasticity, Leading to Direct and Significant...

Clary Sage Oil May Be Pricey, but Its Benefits Are Priceless

Pumpkin Pie Turmeric Breakfast Smoothie - Vegan + Gluten-Free

Component of red wine, grapes can help to reduce inflammation, study finds

Poly MVA: A Novel Therapy for Increasing Energy, Repairing DNA, and Promoting Overall Health

Vitamin D supplementation extends life in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Conquer Your Email Inbox, Increase Productivity and Reduce Stress

The Significance of Selenium

Print Page
Email Article

Nerve Receptor Found to Be Key to Intestinal Inflammation By Duke Researchers

  [ 47 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ] • May 1, 2003

DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have found that a specific nerve cell receptor appears to be necessary to initiate the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), findings they believe could change how physicians treat this disorder.

The results of their studies, which were carried out in rats, could point toward a potential therapy aimed at blocking the receptor, known as vanilloid receptor type 1 (VR-1). Interestingly, they said, VR-1 is the receptor on sensory neurons that receives and transmits the "heat" and "pain" impulses felt when eating raw chili peppers.

The results of the Duke study were reported today (May 1, 2003) in the May 2003 issue of the journal Gut.

IBD is a general term given to a constellation of chronic disorders in which the intestine becomes inflamed, typically resulting in recurring abdominal cramps, pain and diarrhea, in some cases bloody. The cause of IBD is unknown, and it is believed that up to 2 million Americans suffer from this disorder, the researchers said.

"We know that immune modulators known as cytokines are responsible for the inflammation that is the hallmark of the disease, so research has focused on discovering a viral or bacterial trigger," said Christopher Mantyh, M.D., colorectal surgeon and senior member of the Duke team.

"However, our studies have shown that by blocking the VR-1 receptor, we can halt the development of IBD in an animal model," he continued. "So it would appear that the activation of the VR-1 receptor is the signal, or trigger, that 'revs up' the release of cytokines."

It has long been appreciated that sensory neurons within the intestinal system can play a role in the development of inflammation. Key to this process is Substance P, a neurotransmitter found in minute quantities in the human nervous system and intestines. It is primarily involved in the transmission of pain impulses and is also a potent pro-inflammatory mediator in the intestines.

"Studies have shown that using Substance P antagonists as well as denervation -- either surgical or chemically -- can block some forms of intestinal inflammation," Mantyh said. "However, what is missing is that trigger. What was not known was how the nerve cells in the intestine were stimulated to begin the inflammatory process."

In their experiments, the Duke team focused on the newly cloned VR-1 receptor, which can be activated by heat, acid and capsaicin, the ingredient that gives chili peppers their "heat."

Capsaicin stimulates the pain and heat response by binding, like a lock-and-key, to the VR-1 receptors on neurons. Just as long-time chili eaters find that prolonged consumption renders them immune to the peppers' effects, over-stimulation of VR-1 receptors can cause them to become desensitized.

The researchers used three groups of rats. The first group was administered capsaicin at birth, which chemically denervated them by "overstimulating' the VR-1 receptors to the point of inactivating them permanently. They were allowed to reach adulthood. The second group, which were adults, were given the agent capsazepine (CPZ), a VR-1 antagonists which blocks the receptor. The third group, the control, received no additional treatments.

The team then induced colitis, or intestinal inflammation, in all three groups of rats by giving them dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in their water for a week. The animals' reactions to the treatment were carefully monitored and after one week, detailed studies were made of their intestinal tracts.

"In the control rats, DSS caused active colitis with its trademark ulceration of the intestinal lining," Mantyh said. "However, the two other groups showed significantly lower levels of disease. The treated rats were protected from the damaging effects of DSS administration. This data provides strong evidence that an animal model of colitis requires neurons containing VR-1.

"Inhibition of the VR-1 receptor in humans -- either by small doses of CPZ or other antagonists -- may represent a novel therapeutic pathway to prevent IBD," Mantyh continued.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the American Surgical Association and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Other members of the Duke team were Naoki Kihara, M.D., Sebastion de la Fiente, M.D., Kazunori Fujino, M.D., Toku Takahashi, D.M.D., and Theodore Pappas, M.D.

Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Vitamin D3 Extreme™

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products

Article Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment

Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health

Natural Remedies

Enhance Eyelashes Naturally Enhance Eyelashes Naturally
Running on Empty? Fuel Up with NADH Running on Empty? Fuel Up with NADH
Rejuvenating the Brain - How PQQ Helps Power Up Mental Processing Rejuvenating the Brain - How PQQ Helps Power Up Mental Processing
Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones
Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World

ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
Credit Card Processing
Be the first to know about new products, special discounts and the latest health news. *New subscribers only

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map