ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Inflammation Disrupts Memory - What Can You Do to Protect Your Brain?

Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issues

All About Ginkgo Biloba: Benefits of This Timeless Herbal Supplement

Yarrow Oil: Here's Why It Deserves a Place in Your First-Aid Kit

Vitamin D supplement use associated with lower risk of breast cancer

Carnitine deficiency suggested as contributor to autism

Lutein — An Important Nutrient for Eye and Brain Health

Hop Oil: A Safe Sleep Aide

White Camphor Oil: The Purest Camphor Oil

Taurine: Facts About This Crucial Amino Acid

 
Print Page
Email Article

Chlamydia Infection Prevalent Among Female Army Recruits

  [ 36 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • August 13, 2003


Nearly 10 percent of female Army recruits tested positive for the bacteria that causes the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis), according to researchers from Johns Hopkins, the Department of Defense and the Army. The researchers also found that the number of recruits testing positive for chlamydia increased over the four-year duration of the study, from 1996 to 1999.

"These rates are of great concern, and the Army should implement routine screening of its female recruits at entry into the military to protect their health," says Charlotte Gaydos, Dr.P.H., associate professor of medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and lead author of the study appearing in the July issue of journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

"While chlamydia infection usually shows no symptoms in women, it is a major underlying cause of pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and infertility," says Gaydos.

"These sustained high rates of chlamydia infection in female Army recruits provide clear justification for a chlamydia control program for young women entering the Army, consisting of initial screening and treatment followed by periodic rescreening," says Gaydos.

"Programs for screening and treating chlamydia infection have proven to be cost effective, especially when compared to the health problems associated with untreated infections, and a highly sensitive test is now available that requires only a urine sample," says Gaydos.

The researchers found several risk factors associated with infection, including black race, youth (under 25 years of age), Southern hometowns, more than one sex partner, and a history of other sexually transmitted diseases.

Gaydos and colleagues conducted urine-based testing for chlamydia on 23,010 non-healthcare-seeking female Army recruits between January 1996 and June 1999. Questionnaires were used to collect demographic and risk information, such as sexual history, presence or absence of symptoms, and prior history of sexually transmitted diseases.

They found that 9.51 percent of women tested positive for chlamydia for all years the study was conducted, and that during the course of the study, rates increased from 8.51 percent to 9.92 percent.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chlamydia is the most frequently reported bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the United States. More than 650,000 cases were reported in 1999, and three of every four reported cases occurred in persons under age 25. Under-reporting is substantial because most people with chlamydia are not aware of their infections and do not seek testing. An estimated 3 million Americans are infected with chlamydia each year.

Other authors of the study are René Howell and Thomas Quinn of Johns Hopkins, Kelly McKee Jr. of the Womack Army Medical Center, and Joel Gaydos of the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils

Natural Remedies

How Glutathione Can Save Your Life How Glutathione Can Save Your Life
Secret Nutrient for Radiant Skin Secret Nutrient for Radiant Skin
Guarding Against the Dangers of Vitamin D Deficiency Guarding Against the Dangers of Vitamin D Deficiency
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sleep But Were Too Tired to Ask Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sleep But Were Too Tired to Ask
When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map