A doctor’s coping tips for those with cognitive problems of ME/CFS or FM

When you’re suffering the “brain fog” of severe fatigue or pain, an everyday event such as food shopping “is anything but simple,” writes Dr. Gudrun Lange. In this article, published in the Spring 2009 issue of the Bulletin of the IACFS/ME, she explains why, and offers advice on handling such activities in a different way.


Multi-Tasking: A Challenge for Patients with CFS
By Gudrun Lange, PhD
Pain and Fatigue Study Center, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School

As a researcher and a practicing clinical neuropsychologist my task is to assess cognitive function in CFS patients. Once the test measures given are scored and the results interpreted, I provide feedback about my findings.

Very often the findings are consistent with decreased information processing speed and poor working memory while overall intellectual function is usually intact. These results are not uncommon in CFS and are supported by increasing research evidence.

During feedback sessions, I aim to explain the deficits found, but am frequently asked the question: “How do these findings relate to what I am experiencing in my daily life and what, if anything, can I do about it?”

To read the full article at the IACFSME.org website, click here.


To learn more about Dr. Lange and her work, click here.

And to read about current and planned research projects at the UMDNJ Pain and Fatigue Study Center (NYC), click here.

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