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A drooping face; the importance of family history in children with recurrent peripheral facial palsy.

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Abstract

An 18-year-old girl had experienced drooping at the left corner of the mouth for several weeks and could not close her left eye. These symptoms improved gradually and spontaneously. She had had a similar experience 2 years earlier; at that time, the right side of the face was affected. Family members reported similar episodes. After excluding
Lyme borreliosis and cerebellopontine angle tumour, a diagnosis of idiopathic familial peripheral facial palsy was made. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is commonly seen in children and young adults. Obtaining a family history is helpful in these patients: a positive family history is found in 2.4-28.6% of the cases. In the absence of other symptoms, a diagnosis of idiopathic familial peripheral facial palsy should be considered. The prognosis of these patients is generally good and therapy is usually unnecessary.

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2007 Feb 10;151(6):364-6. Case Reports; English Abstract

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