10% Off $75 Orders! Use Code SAVE10P Shop Now
One use per customer. Not available with Autoship. Expires 5/28/18.

Abstract: Are There Clinical or Serological Differences Between Male and Female Patients with Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome?

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (53 votes, average: 2.85 out of 5)
Loading...

J Rheumatol. 2004 Jul;31(7):1352-5. Diaz-Lopez C, Geli C, Corominas H, Malat N, Diaz-Torner C, Llobet JM, De La Serna AR, Laiz A, Moreno M, Vazquez G. Unitat de Reumatologia, Departament de Medicina Interna, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

OBJECTIVE: Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease. It can be primary (pSS) or secondary (sSS) and is observed 90% more in women than in men, mainly in the fourth and fifth decades of life. We investigated the prevalence of serological and clinical manifestations in male and female patients with primary SS.

METHODS: We analyzed 521 female and 28 male patients with pSS between 1993 and 2001. All patients fulfilled >/= 4 of the 1993 European Community Study Group criteria.

RESULTS: Men presented higher concentrations of IgA, rheumatoid factor, and antinuclear antibodies than women. A higher percentage of women than men reported fibromyalgia, thyroidal manifestations, and carpal tunnel syndrome. There were no statistical differences between the 2 groups in relation to the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon, arthritis, erosive osteoarthritis, liver disease, or other visceral manifestations.

CONCLUSION: The pattern of SS in our cohort of patients reveals a difference between male and female patients, in contrast with earlier studies. PMID: 15229956 [PubMed – in process]

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (53 votes, average: 2.85 out of 5)
Loading...



Leave a Reply