Abstract: Correlates of physical activity among women with fibromyalgia syndrome

Ann Behav Med. 2005 Feb;29(1):44-53.

Oliver K, Cronan TA.

SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology.

Background: Fibromyalgia (FMS) is a chronic pain syndrome of unknown origin that lacks standardized treatment. However, participation in physical activity (PA) benefits people with FMS. Despite the psychosocial and health benefits that can be gained through PA, the correlates of PA among people with FMS remain poorly understood.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the effects of cross-sectional and longitudinal correlates of PA among women with FMS.

Methods: Participants were 187 female members of a HMO with a confirmed diagnosis of FMS. They were administered a battery of questionnaires assessing potential correlates of PA. These correlates were suggested by social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model, and have been repeatedly associated with PA among the general population.

Results: Multivariate analyses indicated that self-efficacy for PA and the behavioral processes of change were the strongest discriminators among PA adopters, maintainers, quitters, and those who were sedentary. Enjoyment of PA, barriers to PA, the impact of FMS, and the environment also significantly discriminated among these groups. Longitudinally, changes in self-efficacy were significantly associated with changes in PA. Conclusions: These findings suggest that self-efficacy may play a critical role in both the present and long-term PA of women with FMS. They also lend additional support to the role of social cognitive and transtheoretical variables in discriminating among levels of PA.

PMID: 15677300 [PubMed – in process]

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