Abstract: Depression, coping, and functional disability in juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome

Pain. 2002 Oct;3(5):412-419.

Kashikar-Zuck S, Vaught MH, Goldschneider KR, Graham TB, Miller JC.

This study describes pain characteristics, coping, depression, and functional disability in children with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) and compares them with a group of children with nonmalignant chronic back pain (CBP). Subjects were 18 female subjects (9 to 19 years of age) diagnosed with JPFS and 18 matched control subjects with CBP. Visual Analog Pain Rating Scales, the Pain Coping Questionnaire, the Children[apos ]s Depression Inventory, and Functional Disability Inventory were administered.

Results indicated that both JPFS and CBP groups reported significant disruption in functional abilities and school attendance as a result of chronic pain. Both groups reported mildly elevated symptoms of depression overall, but there was a subgroup of JPFS subjects who reported severe levels of depression. The JPFS group had suffered from pain for significantly longer than the CBP group before being referred for specialty care. However, pain duration was not significantly related to depression, functional disability, or pain coping efficacy.

The levels of functional disability were similar in both groups, but the JPFS group reported somewhat more school absences. The longer time to receive specialty care and identification of a subgroup of depressed subjects at risk for long-term psychosocial consequences are of particular concern in JPFS. [copy ] 2002 by the American Pain Society

PMID: 14622745 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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