Abstract: Neurobiology of fibromyalgia syndrome

J Rheumatol Suppl. 2005 Aug;75:22-8.

Price DD, Staud R.

From the Department of Neuroscience and Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

Accumulating evidence suggests that fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) pain is maintained by tonic impulse input from deep tissues, such as muscle and joints, in combination with central sensitization mechanisms. This nociceptive input may originate in peripheral tissues (trauma and infection) resulting in hyperalgesia/allodynia and/or central sensitization.

Evidence for abnormal sensitization mechanisms in FM includes enhanced temporal summation of delayed pain in response to repeated heat taps and repeated muscle taps, as well as prolonged and enhanced painful after-sensations in FM patients but not control subjects. Moreover, magnitudes of enhanced after-sensations are predictive of FM patients’ ongoing clinical pain.

Such alterations of relevant pain mechanisms may lead to longterm neuroplastic changes that exceed the antinociceptive capabilities of affected individuals, resulting in ever-increasing pain sensitivity and dysfunction. Future research needs to address the important role of abnormal nociception and/or antinociception for chronic pain in FM.

PMID: 16078357 [PubMed – in process]

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (223 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
Loading...



Leave a Reply