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Abstract: NO-mediated alterations in skeletal muscle nutritive blood flow and lactate metabolism in fibromyalgia

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Pain. 2005 Dec 20; [Epub ahead of print]

McIver KL, Evans C, Kraus RM, Ispas L, Sciotti VM, Hickner RC.

Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Exercise and Sport Science, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA.

The purpose of these investigations was to determine if differences exist in skeletal muscle nutritive blood flow and lactate metabolism in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared to healthy women (HC); furthermore, to determine if differences in nitric oxide-mediated systems account for any detected alterations in blood flow and lactate metabolism and contribute to exertional fatigue in FM.

FM (n=8) and HC (n=8) underwent a cycle ergometry test of aerobic capacity, a muscle biopsy for determination of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, nNOS, iNOS) content, and microdialysis for investigation of muscle nutritive blood flow and lactate metabolism.

During prolonged (3h) resting conditions, the ethanol outflow/inflow ratio (inversely related to blood flow) increased in FM over time compared to HC (P<0.05). FM also exhibited a reduced nutritive blood flow response to aerobic exercise (P<0.05).

There was an increase in dialysate lactate in response to acetylcholine in FM, and to sodium nitroprusside in both groups, with a greater rise in dialysate lactate in FM (P<0.05). The iNOS protein content was higher in FM and was negatively correlated with total exercise time (r(2)=0.462, P<0.05).

In conclusion: (1) There is reduced nutritive flow response to aerobic exercise and reduced maximal exercise time in FM that might relate to higher iNOS protein content and contribute to exertional fatigue in FM; (2) The increased dialysate lactate in FM in response to stimulation of NOS or a nitric oxide donor suggest that FM may be more sensitive than HC to the suppressive effect of nitric oxide on oxidative phosphorylation.

PMID: 16376018 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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