Abstract: Patients’ perceived barriers to active self-management of chronic conditions

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Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Jun;57(3):300-7.

Jerant AF, Friederichs-Fitzwater MM, Moore M.

Department of Family and Community Medicine (DF and CM), University of California Davis (UCD), School of Medicine, 4860 Y Street, Suite 2300, Sacramento, CA 95818, USA.

Few studies have elicited barriers to patient self-management of chronic conditions, and only one concerned people with two or more conditions. To inform development of Homing in on Health (HioH), a home delivery variant of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), we conducted 10 focus groups involving 54 chronically ill people, 46 (85%) of whom had multiple conditions. The goals were to elicit perceived barriers to active self-management and to accessing self-management support resources.

Depression, weight problems, difficulty exercising, fatigue, poor physician communication, low family support, pain, and financial problems were the most frequently noted barriers to active self-management.

The most common barriers to accessing self-management support resources were lack of awareness, physical symptoms, transportation problems, and cost/lack of insurance coverage. Our findings provided initial support for the Homing in on Health approach, since many of the barriers identified may be more amenable to home-based intervention than to centralized, facility-based programs.

PMID: 15893212 [PubMed – in process]

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