Abstract: What can rehabilitation interventions achieve in patients with primary fibromyalgia?

Curr Opin Rheumatol 2003 Mar;15(2):145-50

Sprott H.

Symptoms of primary fibromyalgia (FM) persist for years, independent of applied therapy. That is the sad reality we have to deal with. But is that really true? The following review is a scan of literature from September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002, concerning rehabilitation interventions for patients with FM, to find progress in this field and to ascertain state-of-the-art treatment strategies for the disease. The main problem when treating patients with FM successfully is the heterogeneity of the patients’ group. Several investigators determined subgroups within FM patients diagnosed by the 1990 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria of FM. Therefore, uniform recommendations for treatment cannot be given. Current treatment recommendations for FM include reassurance and explanation of the nature of the illness, evaluation and eradication of mechanical stressors as far as possible, symptomatic analgesic drug treatment, moderate individually adapted physical exercises, and adjuvant psychotherapeutic support in an interdisciplinary setting. Individually adapted measures are highly emphasized to differentially treat FM subgroups, as far as identified. This review will focus on these points on the one hand, and provide an overview about the current symptomatically-oriented therapy on the other hand. This all occurs against the background of an unknown etiology of the disease so far. Experimental approaches will be noted as well. The demonstration of a long-term effective intervention for managing the symptoms associated with FM is needed.

PMID: 12598803 [PubMed – in process]

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