Assessment of the effects of aquatic therapy on global symptomatology in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized controlled trial – Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dec 2008

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (24 votes, average: 2.65 out of 5)
Loading...

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of a 16-week exercise therapy in a chest-high pool of warm water through applicable tests in the clinical practice on the global symptomatology of women with fibromyalgia (FM) and to determine exercise adherence levels.

Design: A randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Testing and training were completed at the university.

Participants: Middle-aged women with FM (n=60) and healthy women (n=25).

Intervention: A 16-week aquatic training program, including strength training, aerobic training, and relaxation exercises.

Main Outcome Measures: Tender point count (syringe calibrated), health status (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire); sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index); physical (endurance strength to low loads tests), psychologic (State Anxiety Inventory), and cognitive function (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task); and adherence 12 months after the completion of the study.

Results:

• For all the measurements, the patients showed significant deficiencies compared with the healthy subjects.

• Efficacy analysis (n=29) and intent-to-treat analysis (n=34) of the exercise therapy was effective in decreasing the tender point count and improving sleep quality, cognitive function, and physical function.

• Anxiety remained unchanged during the follow-up.

• The exercise group had a significant improvement of health status, not associated exclusively with the exercise intervention. There were no changes in the control group.

• Twenty-three patients in the exercise group were exercising regularly 12 months after completing the program.

Conclusions: An exercise therapy 3 times a week for 16 weeks in a warm pool could improve most of the symptoms of FM and cause a high adherence to exercise in unfit women with heightened FM symptomatology. The therapeutic intervention’s effects can be assessed through applicable tests in the clinical practice.

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dec 2008;89(12):2250-7. PMID: 19061736, by Munguía-Izquierdo D, Legaz-Arrese A. Section of Physical Education and Sports, University Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain. [E-mail: dmunizq@upo.es]

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (24 votes, average: 2.65 out of 5)
Loading...



One thought on “Assessment of the effects of aquatic therapy on global symptomatology in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized controlled trial – Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dec 2008”

  1. spencer says:

    Everywhere I read how helpful aquatic therapy is for fibro sufferers such as myself. I want to mention that I have tried this type of therapy on at least 3 occasions, probably even more, and each time the exercises make me feel far worse than when I started. I also have other disorders, such as DDD, spinal stenosis, spondylosis, spondylolisthesis, and I tend to get sciatic pain unless I am careful not to twist my body on that side. I also have plantar fasciitis very badly in one foot, and I get tendinitis often in my right elbow.

    I have just joined a fitness/wellness center that is part of CenterState Medical Center in Freehold, NJ. I had a personal trainer show me exercises to do in the pool which included resistance by the use of pulling lightweight weights back and forth under the water. It’s been about 3 weeks since then, and it did make me feel worse with sudden sciatic pain.

    What I will do is some of the exercises shown to me and do them at my own pace, since it seems not one therapist or trainer gets my exercises suitable for myself.

    Any suggestions or input? Thank you.

Leave a Reply