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Binding of human plasminogen to Borrelia burgdorferi.

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Abstract

We studied the binding of plasminogen to Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochete which causes
Lyme disease and produces no endogenous proteases which digest extracellular matrix proteins. Using 125I-labeled plasminogen, we demonstrated that B. burgdorferi bound human plasminogen and that this binding was inhibitable with unlabeled plasminogen. 125I-labeled plasminogen binding by B. burgdorferi was also inhibited by the lysine analog epsilon-aminocaproic acid. There was no significant difference in the binding of Glu- or Lys-plasminogen to B. burgdorferi. Binding of plasminogen was similar in low-passage (infectious) and high-passage (noninfectious) isolates of B. burgdorferi. Plasminogen bound to the surface of B. burgdorferi could be converted into plasmin by a human urokinase-type plasminogen activator. 125I-labeled plasminogen ligand blots of borrelial membrane proteins demonstrated two prominent binding proteins at approximately 70 and approximately 30 kDa. By Western blot (immunoblot), the 30-kDa protein was found to be outer surface protein A (Osp A) of B. burgdorferi. 125I-labeled plasminogen binding to both the 70-kDa protein and Osp A was inhibited by approximately 90% with a 1,000-fold excess of unlabeled plasminogen. By scanning densitometry, the 70-kDa band bound > 10 time more 125I-labeled plasminogen than did Osp A. An Osp A-deficient mutant of B. burgdorferi and wild-type B. burgdorferi bound equal amounts of 125I-labeled plasminogen. Ligand blots of membrane proteins from an Osp A-deficient mutant showed association of 125I-labeled plasminogen at only the 70-kDa protein. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the 70-kDa protein had a pI of approximately 5.3, clearly separable from Osp A. The association of host plasmin(ogen) with borrelial surface proteins provides a mechanism by which B. burgdorferi can digest extracellular matrix and disseminate.

Infect Immun. 1995 Sep;63(9):3491-6. Research Support, U.S. Gov’t, P.H.S.

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