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Ceftriaxone-induced cholelithiasis–a harmless side-effect?.

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Abstract

43 children suffering from borreliosis, meningitis and septicemia were treated with ceftriaxone. A six year old boy with acute jaundice due to ceftriaxone induced cholelithiasis encouraged us to reevaluate the frequency of ceftriaxone induced cholelithiasis and its’ sequelae in children in a prospective study. Out of 43 children (age 6.3 years, 4 months to 16 years, male: female 25:18), 20 children (46.5%) showed sonographical evidence for ceftriaxone induced cholelithiasis after a treatment of at least 10 days. Two of them even had signs of intrahepatic cholestasis, 3 kids suffered from severe abdominal pain, non of them showed serologic abnormalities. Another 5 children (11.6%) had sludge in the gallbladder without evidence for cholelithiasis. In all patients the “pseudocholelithiasis” spontaneously resolved within at most 2 months. We suggest a sonographical examination of the gallbladder at the end of the ceftriaxone treatment in order to detect cholelithiasis, which might call for further monitoring and maybe dietary treatment.

Klin Padiatr. 1993 Nov-Dec;205(6):421-3. English Abstract

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