Chronic fatigue syndrome: Comments on deconditioning, blood volume, and resulting cardiac function – Source: Clinical Science (London), Jun 18, 2009

Cardiovascular and autonomic dysfunction have been suggested to underly the symptoms accompanying CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome). In the [June 2009] issue of Clinical Science, Hurwitz and colleagues have investigated:

• Whether deficits were present in cardiac output and blood volume in a cohort of patients with CFS

• And whether these were linked to illness severity and sedentary lifestyle.

The results clearly demonstrated:

• Reduced cardiac stroke volume and cardiac output in more severely afflicted patients with CFS,

• Which is primarily attributable to a measurable reduction in blood volume.

Similar findings are observed:

• In microgravity and bedrest deconditioning,

• In forms of orthostatic intolerance,

• And to a lesser extent in sedentary people.

The circulatory consequences of reduced cardiac output may help to account for many of the findings of the syndrome.

Source: Clinical Science (London), Jun 18, 2009. PMID: 19534728, by Stewart JM. Pediatrics and Physiology, New York Medical College, Hawthone, New York, USA. [E-mail: stewart@nymc.ed]

[Note: See also Hurwitz, BE, Klimas NG, et al. "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Illness severity, sedentary lifestyle, blood volume and evidence of diminished cardiac function," Clinical Science, May 26, 2009.]

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