Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and the Potential Role of T Cells

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By S. L. Hardcastle et al.

Abstract

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a multifactorial disorder defined by symptom-specific criteria and characterised by severe and prolonged fatigue. CFS/ME typically affects a variety of bodily systems, including the immune system.

Patients with CFS/ME exhibit significantly reduced Natural Killer (NK) cell activity suggesting immune which may be hallmarks of changes in the adaptive immune system, potentially including T cell subsets and function.

The principal purpose of T cells is to regulate immune responses and maintain immune homeostasis. These regulatory measures can often be compromised during illness and may present in a number of diseases including CFS/ME. This review paper examines the role of T cells in CFS/ME and the potential impact of T cells on CFS/ME immune profiles with an evaluation of the current literature.

Source: S. L. Hardcastle, E. W. Brenu, D.R. Stainesa, S. Marshall-Gradisnik. Biological Markers and Guided Therapy, Vol. 1, 2014, no. 1, 25 -38, HIKARI Ltd. doi.org/10.12988/bmgt.2014.3122