Clinical Trial: Gabapentin in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia

A randomized double-blind, placebo-control clinical study is underway to determine the effectiveness of Gabapentin in the treatment of pain associated with Fibromyalgia. Participants must be 18 years of age and older, be diagnosed with Fibromyalgia as defined by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and live in either the Boston or Cincinnati area.

Fibromyalgia, as defined by the study, is "a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder of unknown etiology, is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and multiple tender points; the disease affects 3 to 6 million Americans. A person is considered to have fibromyalgia if he or she has widespread pain in combination with tenderness in at least 11 of 18 specific tender point sites."

According to MedLinePlus (link below), Gabapentin (GA-ba-pen-tin) is marketed in the United States and Canada as Neurontin. It also goes by Novo-Gabapentin and GBP. The drug is an anticonvulsant and antineuralgic. Gabapentin, which is available only by prescription from a physician, is used to help control some types of seizures in the treatment of epilepsy and to manage a condition called postherpetic neuralgia (pain after "shingles"). The study is simultaneously being conducted by the McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, Massachusetts; Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Newton, Massachusetts; and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Cincinnati, Ohio. It is scheduled to be completed in March 2006. Additional information:

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