Conservation of Resources and Quality of Life in Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Journal: Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Vol. 13(4) 2006 pp. 5-18. [Published online ahead of print. Article copies are available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-HAWORTH. E-mail address: ; Website:] Authors and affiliation: Renée R. Taylor, Supriya Kulkarni, Yukiko Shiraishi. University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Occupational Therapy. Correspondence to Renee R. Taylor DOI: 10.1300/J092v13n04_02

Objective: To examine the relationship between resources and quality of life in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Participants and Study

Design: A cross-sectional design was used to describe associations between resource loss and gain and quality of life for 47 individuals diagnosed with CFS. Main Outcome Measures: The Conservation of Resources Evaluation was used to measure resources in terms of perceived loss and gain. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the Quality of Life Index.

Results: Total resource loss and total resource gain were significant correlates of overall quality of life. Gains in self-esteem, energy, and work resources were associated with higher-perceived quality of life. Material loss and energy loss were associated with lower-perceived quality of life.

Conclusions: Findings for the relationships between perceived resources of self-esteem, work, material items, and energy and perceived quality of life can be used to inform future rehabilitation efforts. These relationships appear to occur independently of illness severity among individuals with CFS.

Keywords: Conservation of resources theory, quality of life, chronic fatigue syndrome.

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