Defect in Immune Response Leads to Recurring Bladder Infections

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Mast Cell Interleukin-10 Drives Localized Tolerance in Chronic Bladder Infection

– Source: Immunity, February 15, 2013

By Cheryl Y. Chan et al.

Highlights

  • MC-dependent immunosuppressive transcriptional program specific to the bladder
  • Local production of IL-10 results in suppressed humoral and cell-mediated responses
  • Multiple MC-deficient mouse models show tissue-specific immunosuppressive role of MC
  • Bladder is a site exhibiting an intrinsic degree of MC-maintained immune privilege

Summary: The lower urinary tract’s virtually inevitable exposure to external microbial pathogens warrants efficient tissue-specialized defenses to maintain sterility. The observation that the bladder can become chronically infected in combination with clinical observations that antibody responses after bladder infections are not detectable suggest defects in the formation of adaptive immunity and immunological memory. We have identified a broadly immunosuppressive transcriptional program specific to the bladder, but not the kidney, during infection of the urinary tract that is dependent on tissue-resident mast cells (MCs). This involves localized production of interleukin-10 and results in suppressed humoral and cell-mediated responses and bacterial persistence. Therefore, in addition to the previously described role of MCs orchestrating the early innate immunity during bladder infection, they subsequently play a tissue-specific immunosuppressive role. These findings may explain the prevalent recurrence of bladder infections and suggest the bladder as a site exhibiting an intrinsic degree of MC-maintained immune privilege.

Source: Immunity, 2013; DOI:10.1016/j.immuni.2012.10.019. Cheryl Y. Chan, Ashley L. St. John, Soman N. Abraham.

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