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Erythrocyte-aggregating relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia crocidurae induces formation of microemboli.

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Abstract

The African relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia crocidurae forms aggregates with erythrocytes, resulting in a delayed immune response. Mice were infected with B. crocidurae and monitored during 50 days after infection. Spirochetes were observed extravascularly at day 2 after infection. Two days later, inflammatory responses, cell death, and tissue damage were evident. The pathologic responses in lungs and kidneys were similar, whereas the symptoms in the brains were delayed, with a less pronounced inflammatory response. Microemboli were found in the blood vessels, possibly a result of the erythrocyte aggregation. The B. crocidurae invasion emerged more rapidly than has been described for
Lyme disease-causing Borrelia species. In addition to erythrocyte rosetting, the presence of extravascular B. crocidurae indicates a novel route for these bacteria to propagate and cause damage in the mammalian host. The histopathologic findings in this study may explain the clinical manifestations of human relapsing fever.

J Infect Dis. 1999 Dec;180(6):1929-38. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t

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