Fragrant plant & fruit scents repress activity of more than 100 genes involved in sustaining stress response

Feeling stressed? Then try savoring the scent of lemon, mango, lavender, or other fragrant plants.

Scientists in Japan have reported the first scientific evidence that inhaling certain fragrances alters gene activity and blood chemistry in ways that can reduce stress levels. Their study was published June 24 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.*

In the new study, Akio Nakamura and colleagues note that people have inhaled the scent of certain plants since ancient times to help reduce stress, fight inflammation and depression, and induce sleep. Aromatherapy, the use of fragrant plant oils to improve mood and health, has become a popular form of alternative medicine today. And linalool is one of the most widely used substances to soothe away emotional stress. [Note: Linalool is a scented compound present in many foods & flowers including for example tea, orange, grape, mango, lemon, tomato, basil and lavender.]

Until now, however, linalool's exact effects on the body have been a deep mystery.

The scientists exposed lab rats to stressful conditions while inhaling and not inhaling linalool.

• Linalool returned stress-elevated levels of neutrophils and lymphocytes – key parts of the immune system – to near-normal levels.

• Inhaling linalool also reduced the activity of more than 100 genes that go into overdrive in stressful situations.

The findings could form the basis of new blood tests for identifying fragrances that can soothe stress, the researchers say.
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* Article: "Stress Repression in Restrained Rats by (R)-(–)-Linalool Inhalation and Gene Expression Profiling of Their Whole Blood Cells" by Akio Nakamura, et al., Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, Jun 24, 2009.

Source: American Chemical Society news release, Jul 22, 2009

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One thought on “Fragrant plant & fruit scents repress activity of more than 100 genes involved in sustaining stress response”

  1. Laurie58 says:

    Hi,

    Thanks for the article.

    It’s interesting research, indeed! I’ve long practiced inhaling scents from flowers as a wellness therapy practice. It’s nice to see the practice studied, scientifically.

    All the best,
    Laurie

    Laurie Lacey
    http://www.naturalhealingtalk.com

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