Frequent napping is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, pain, and nocturia in older adults: Findings from the National Sleep Foundation ‘2003 Sleep in America’ Poll

Journal: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2007 Apr;15(4):344-50.

Authors and affiliations: Foley DJ, Vitiello MV, Bliwise DL, Ancoli-Israel S, Monjan AA, Walsh JK. Center for Mental Health Services (DJF), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, USA. [E-mail: daniel.foley@samhsa.hhs.gov ]

PMID: 17384317

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of regular napping among older adults.

Methods: The National Sleep Foundation's "2003 Sleep in America Poll," a 20-minute telephone interview that focused on the topic of "sleep and aging" (N = 1,506 adults 55-84 years of age).

Results: Overall, 15% of respondents reported regular napping, ranging in prevalence from 10% among those 55-64 years of age to 25% among those 75-84 years of age. In addition to older age and a strong association with excessive daytime sleepiness, other factors that independently increased prevalence included a diagnosis of depression, bodily pain, and nocturia.

Conclusions: Regular napping is common among older adults. Longitudinal studies of napping behavior and health status are needed to establish risk factors other than excessive daytime sleepiness.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (277 votes, average: 3.05 out of 5)
Loading...



Leave a Reply