10% Off $75 Orders! Use Code SAVE10P Shop Now
One use per customer. Not available with Autoship. Expires 5/28/18.

Garlic’s Effects on Cancer Cells in Mice

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (51 votes, average: 3.05 out of 5)
Loading...

At Experimental Biology ’95, a meeting of 18 scientific societies, a paper was presented summarizing in vitro and animal studies of the action of garlic compounds on cancer. The results by the statement: “Our body of research indicates that more than one mechanism exists by which garlic compounds can inhibit carcinogen-induced tumors or cancer cell growth.”

The study was State researcher Sujatha Sundaram and Dr. John Milner, head of the Nutritional Department at Penn State. In the most recent study, mice with transplanted tumor cells from human colon cancer were treated with thou soluble garlic compound daily disulfide at the dosage of 1 mg dissolved in corn oil three times a week for three weeks. The treated tumors shrunk by 60%, whereas similar tumors treated only with corn oil grew steadily. The researchers described how, in previous in vitro work, the same compound killed lab cultures of human colon, lung, and skin cancer cells. In another study reported by Dr. Milner and colleagues, a water-soluble compound in processed garlic, S-allycystein, inhibited the incidence of breast tumors in rats and the binding of carcinogen to rat breast cells.

The researchers concluded: “There is epidemiological evidence that links garlic consumptions with a lower risk of colon cancer. Our latest studies support these findings. It appears that garlic can be beneficial in therapies that either prevent or treat chemically induced cancers.”

Reprinted with permission from Nutritional News/ Vitamin Research Products>

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (51 votes, average: 3.05 out of 5)
Loading...



Leave a Reply