Heterologous immunity: Immunopathology, autoimmunity and protection during viral infections – Source: Autoimmunity, Jan 20, 2011

Heterologous immunity is a common phenomenon present in all infections. Most of the time it is beneficial, mediating protective immunity, but in some individuals that have the wrong crossreactive response it leads to a cascade of events that result in severe immunopathology.

Infections have been associated with:

Autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis and lupus erythematosis,

But also with unusual autoimmune-like pathologies where the immune system appears dysregulated, such as sarcoidosis [inflammation/tiny lumps of cells in various tissues], colitis [inflammation of colon], panniculitis [inflammation of fatty layer under the skin], bronchiolitis obliterans [inflamed/scarred small airways], infectious mononucleosis [Epstein-Barr] and even chronic fatigue syndrome.

Here we review the evidence that to better understand these autoreactive pathologies it requires an evaluation of how T cells are regulated and evolve during sequential infections with different pathogens under the influence of heterologous immunity.

Source: Autoimmunity, Jan 20, 2011. PMID: 21250837, by Selin LK, Wlodarczyk MF, Kraft AR, Nie S, Kenney LL, Puzone R, Celada f. Department of Pathology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Clinical Epidemiology, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa, Italy; Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York,  USA. [E-mail: liisa.selin@umassmed.edu]

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One thought on “Heterologous immunity: Immunopathology, autoimmunity and protection during viral infections – Source: Autoimmunity, Jan 20, 2011”

  1. Cheryllemarie says:

    I just discovered ,through new blood tests, that I have almost no KT Cells left in my body. I also have a possible virus infection in my intestines of either CMV or HHV6. (In addition I have Lyme Disease and all the other attending immune problems and viruses).
    But, in investigating this new intestinal problem, I ran across scetchy information about T cells attaching to the mucous lining of an intestine infected with these viruses.
    This sounds stupid, but is it remotely possible that’s where my KT cells went??????

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