Improving Pediatricians’ Recognition of Juvenile Fibromyalgia

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Juvenile Fibromyalgia Syndrome and Improved Recognition by Pediatric Primary Care Providers.

By Judith D.  McLeod, DNP, RN, CPNP

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (JFS) is a medically unexplained illness that can cause persistent, diffuse pain in a child or adolescent. This pain can lead to anxiety or depression and absence from school or work, and it can adversely affect a child's quality of life and family relationships. Prompt recognition of JFS may decrease problems for pediatric patients with chronic pain, but pediatric primary care providers' lack of familiarity with JFS can cause a delay in diagnosis.

METHOD: A project using a developed screening tool, the SORE Scoresheet, was implemented in the pediatric clinic at Kaiser Permanente Fontana from September 2011 to January 2012. Pediatric providers were educated about the tool before the project began.

RESULTS: Twenty-two patients with JFS were referred with use of the SORE Scoresheet. Symptoms of JFS matched at a rate of 93% between the providers and the rheumatologist, and a reduction in the number of weeks to referral and the number of visits before referral was found compared with a sample of patients with JFS from  2010.

CONCLUSION: Pediatric provider education and development of a screening tool assists with the recognition of JFS.

Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care, August 26, 2013. By Judith D.  McLeod, DNP, RN, CPNP.