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In situ immunodetection of neuronal caspase-3 activation in Alzheimer disease.

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The mechanism by which cells die in Alzheimer disease (AD) is unknown. Several investigators speculate that much of the cell loss may be due to apoptosis, a highly regulated form of programmed cell death.

Caspase-3 is a critical effector of neuronal apoptosis and may be inappropriately activated in AD. To address this possibility, we examined cortical and hippocampal brain sections from AD patients, as well as 2 animal models of AD, for in situ evidence of caspase-3 activation. We report here that senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the AD brain are not associated with caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, amyloid beta (A beta) deposition in the APPsw transgenic mouse model of AD does not result in caspase-3 activation despite the ability of A beta to induce caspase-3 activation and neuronal apoptosis in vitro. AD brain sections do, however, exhibit caspase-3 activation in hippocampal neurons undergoing granulovacuolar degeneration.

Our data suggests that caspase-3 does not have a significant role in the widespread neuronal cell death that occurs in AD, but may contribute to the specific loss of hippocampal neurons involved in learning and memory.

Source: J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1999 Sep;58(9):1020-6

PMID: 10499444, UI: 99427790

(Department of Pathology, Center for Study of Nervous System Injury, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA)

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