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Isolated intracranial hypertension as the presenting sign of Lyme disease.

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Abstract

We report the case of an eight-year-old patient referred by his primary care physician for chronic headache. Bilateral papilledema was observed along with right sixth cranial nerve palsy, leading to the diagnosis of intracranial hypertension. Head CT showed no mass lesion.
Lyme serology was positive by both Elisa and Western blot. Anti-Borrelia antibodies were positive in the cerebrospinal fluid, with intrathecal synthesis confirming neuroborreliosis. Clinical response to ceftriaxone and acetazolamide was favorable. Intracranial hypertension is rarely caused by
Lyme disease. Ophthalmologists should be aware of this clinical presentation, since the presenting clinical signs may be purely ophthalmologic. In addition, early diagnosis may avoid optic nerve atrophy or
disease spread.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

J Fr Ophtalmol. 2012 Nov;35(9):720.e1-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jfo.2011.12.011. Epub 2012 Sep 19. Case Reports; English Abstract

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